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Category Archives: travel abroad

Thoughts on Pratchett – [Part 1]

Earlier this year, when I was in Germany on tour, Terry Pratchett died.

It didn’t come as a complete shock. We’ve known for ages that he was sick. We’ve had years to brace for the inevitable impact.

Even so, it hit me surprisingly hard. I hadn’t expected that.

Odds are, if you know much anything about me, you know I’ve been a fan of Pratchett for years. If you follow me on goodreads you’ve seen me write reviews so gushy that they border on the inarticulate.

Terry Pratchett – Facing Extinction

I didn’t know him. Honestly, I didn’t even know too much about him. I saw him speak once at a convention in Madison, and got to meet him very briefly. I wrote about it on the blog.

The fact remains that his work (and a few of the things I knew about him) had a huge impact on me.

So… yeah. It hit me kinda hard.

If you’re in your 20’s and 30’s and reading this blog on the interweb, it may be hard for you to understand that our opinions about authors used to come almost entirely from reading their books. Even after the internet crawled gasping onto the devonian shore of the 1990’s things like social media and author blogs simply didn’t exist in any meaningful way.

As a result, one of my first exposures to Terry Pratchett as a person was in an interview in the Onion back in 1995. Just to give you an idea of the time frame. That was back when you could pick up a copy of The Onion printed on paper. What’s more, it available *only* on paper, and even then, you could only get it in my home town of Madison, WI.

What Pratchett said in that interview had a big effect on me, as I’d been working on my own novel for a couple years at that point.

It took some digging (as I said, this was published pre-internet) but here’s the interview:

O: What’s with the big-ass hat?

Pratchett: Ah… That’s the hat I wear. I don’t know, it… It… That hat, or types like it, I’ve worn for years and years. Because I bought one, and I liked it. And then people started taking photographs of me in it, and now, certainly in the UK, it’s almost a case of if I don’t turn up in my hat people don’t know who I am. So maybe I could just send this hat to signings. I just like hats. I like Australian book tours, because Australians are really, I mean that is the big hat country, Australia.

O: You’re quite a writer. You’ve a gift for language, you’re a deft hand at plotting, and your books seem to have an enormous amount of attention to detail put into them. You’re so good you could write anything. Why write fantasy?

Pratchett: I had a decent lunch, and I’m feeling quite amiable. That’s why you’re still alive. I think you’d have to explain to me why you’ve asked that question.

O: It’s a rather ghettoized genre.

P: This is true. I cannot speak for the US, where I merely sort of sell okay. But in the UK I think every book— I think I’ve done twenty in the series— since the fourth book, every one has been one the top ten national bestsellers, either as hardcover or paperback, and quite often as both. Twelve or thirteen have been number one. I’ve done six juveniles, all of those have nevertheless crossed over to the adult bestseller list. On one occasion I had the adult best seller, the paperback best-seller in a different title, and a third book on the juvenile bestseller list. Now tell me again that this is a ghettoized genre.

O: It’s certainly regarded as less than serious fiction.

P:  (Sighs) Without a shadow of a doubt, the first fiction ever recounted was fantasy. Guys sitting around the campfire— Was it you who wrote the review? I thought I recognized it— Guys sitting around the campfire telling each other stories about the gods who made lightning, and stuff like that. They did not tell one another literary stories. They did not complain about difficulties of male menopause while being a junior lecturer on some midwestern college campus. Fantasy is without a shadow of a doubt the ur-literature, the spring from which all other literature has flown. Up to a few hundred years ago no one would have disagreed with this, because most stories were, in some sense, fantasy. Back in the middle ages, people wouldn’t have thought twice about bringing in Death as a character who would have a role to play in the story. Echoes of this can be seen in Pilgrim’s Progress, for example, which hark back to a much earlier type of storytelling. The epic of Gilgamesh is one of the earliest works of literature, and by the standard we would apply now— a big muscular guys with swords and certain godlike connections— That’s fantasy. The national literature of Finland, the Kalevala. Beowulf in England. I cannot pronounce Bahaghvad-Gita but the Indian one, you know what I mean. The national literature, the one that underpins everything else, is by the standards that we apply now, a work of fantasy.

Now I don’t know what you’d consider the national literature of America, but if the words Moby Dick are inching their way towards this conversation, whatever else it was, it was also a work of fantasy. Fantasy is kind of a plasma in which other things can be carried. I don’t think this is a ghetto. This is, fantasy is, almost a sea in which other genres swim. Now it may be that there has developed in the last couple of hundred years a subset of fantasy which merely uses a different icongraphy, and that is, if you like, the serious literature, the Booker Prize contender. Fantasy can be serious literature. Fantasy has often been serious literature. You have to fairly dense to think that Gulliver’s Travels is only a story about a guy having a real fun time among big people and little people and horses and stuff like that. What the book was about was something else. Fantasy can carry quite a serious burden, and so can humor. So what you’re saying is, strip away the trolls and the dwarves and things and put everyone into modern dress, get them to agonize a bit, mention Virginia Woolf a few times, and there! Hey! I’ve got a serious novel. But you don’t actually have to do that.

(Pauses) That was a bloody good answer, though I say it myself.

I’m looking forward to buying myself a cheese hat.

O: Back to the hat.

P: Let’s go back to the hat… Everybody needs an edge, and if the hat gives you an edge, why not wear a hat? When you get started writing, you’re one of the crowd. If the hat helps, I’ll wear a hat— I’ll wear two hats! In fact, I’m definitely going to buy a cheese hat before I leave here. We’ve never heard of them in the UK, and I can see it as being the latest thing in fashion.

Okay, you can turn the tape back off again.

I actually remember where I was when I read that. Right now, twenty years later, I remember where I was sitting as I held the paper and read it.

I’m not going to be cliche and say it changed my life.

You know what? I am. I’m going to say it. It changed my life.

Remember what year this was. It was 1995. This was before Harry Potter was written. Before Neil Gaiman wrote Neverwhere.

Pixar has just released its first movie. There was no Matrix. No Sixth Sense. No Lord of The Rings movies. Pan’s Labyrinth and Hellboy were a decade away.

There was no Game of Thrones on HBO. Hell, there wasn’t even Legend of the Seeker. Buffy the Vampire Slayer was 2 years away, and even more years from being recognized as brilliant television, rather than silly fluff with vampires.

I had been writing my fantasy novel for about two years, and while I loved fantasy, I knew deep down, it was something I should feel ashamed of. Fantasy novels were the books I read as a kid, and people picked on me for it. There were no classes on the subject at the University. I knew deep down in my bones that no matter how much I happened to love fantasy, it was all silly bullshit.

Even these days, people look down on fantasy. They think of it as kid stuff. They dismiss it as worthless. They say not real literature. People say that *NOW* despite the fact that Game of Thrones and The Hobbit and Avengers and Harry Potter are bigger than The Beatles.

That’s NOW. If you weren’t around back then, you really can’t begin to understand how much worse it was. When I told people I was working on a fantasy novel, a lot of people wouldn’t even really know what I was talking about.

I would say, “I’m writing a fantasy novel” and people would look at me with earnest confusion and concern in their eyes, and they would say, “Why?”

Then I read that article, and it filled me with hope. With pride.

*     *     *

I’ve got more to say on this, but this blog is already really long. And I’m leaving for PAX in the morning, so I’ll save the rest for next week

Be good to each other everyone,

pat

Also posted in emo bullshit, European Adventures, Fantasy, Stories about stories., the longest fucking blog ever, the man behind the curtain | By Pat77 Responses

German Tour: An Update

Once I posted about the events I’d be doing in Germany, I got a fair number of people speaking up in the comments of that blog, saying that the event they were hoping to attend was sold out.

Needless to say, this was not great news to me. The main reason I’m coming to Germany is to see as many of you as possible. If places were sold out three weeks ahead of time… well… it wasn’t an ideal situation.

die musik der stille

Once we caught wind of the potential problems, my team and I sprung into deft and decisive action. By which I mean to say we e-mailed around and called some people, seeing what we could do to make things better….

Luckily, some of the problems we heard about were easy to fix because they didn’t actually exist. It was just that some people had the wrong information. Other events we did what we could to open them up to more people.

So. Here’s all the most up-to-date information about the upcoming events:

In chronological order:

  • March 14, 2015: Leipzig

The reading and signing at the Leipzig Book Festival is free to all, with no ticket necessary, and will easily be our biggest event with 800 seats available.

7:30pm UTC+1
Reading Q&A, and signing in Leipzig
Peterskirche, St. Peter’s Church
Schletterstr. 5
04107, Leipzig (South)
Facebook Event

  • March 16, 2015: Berlin

We’ve got a bigger venue for the event in Berlin. It’s about 5 blocks away from the bookstore that was originally hosting it, so now we can seat 700 people.

This event is also free with no ticket necessary, so no worries there.

7:00pm UTC+1
Reading, Q&A, and Signing at Humboldt University
Audimax of the Humboldt University Berlin
Unter den Linden 6
10117 Berlin
Facebook Event

  • March 17, 2015: Cologne

lit.Cologne still has a few tickets available.

There was incorrect info on the site, and it’s been updated and working again. That said, it takes place on a boat, so once it’s sold out, there’s nothing to do to get more seats there. So if you want a ticket, you should grab one quick.

9:00pm UTC+1
Reading, Q&A, and Signing at the lit.Cologne
MS RheinEnergie/Literaturschiff Frankenwerft KD-Anleger,
Innenstadt,
50667 Köln
Facebook Event

  • March 18, 2015: Reutlingen

Reutlingen is going to be a fair-sized event at 400 people.

That said, it’s a ticketed event, and they may sell out soon. You can buy tickets here, or you can check out the livestream, which will be available to view on LovelyBooks.

8:00pm UTC+1
Reading, Q&A, and Signing at the lit.Cologne
Stadthalle Reutlingen
Oskar-Kalbfell-Platz 8,
72764 Reutlingen
Facebook Event

  • March 20, 2015: Vienna

EDIT: We’ve added a second, earlier signing this day at the same venue, since the first event is booked solid. Info in the Facebook event…

3:00pm – 5:00pm UTC+1
Reading, Q&A, and Signing at the Fantasy Festival
Kuppitsch Book Trade
GmbH Scots Gasse 4
1010 Vienna
Facebook Event

The bookstore was pleasantly surprised by the response to our Facebook Event for this, and because of the expected turn-out, they’ve started taking reservations by email for seats.

They’re already down to standing-room only, so if you’d like to make sure you’re on the list to get in (it’s free, they just need a headcount), email the bookstore at vindragona [@] kuppitsch.at

7:30pm UTC+1
Reading, Q&A, and Signing at the Fantasy Festival
Kuppitsch Book Trade
GmbH Scots Gasse 4
1010 Vienna
Facebook Event

* * *

I hope that clarifies things for you, folks. If you have any more questions, let us know in the comments below, and we’ll do our best to get answers to you.

That said, please be aware that we have a bit of a language barrier going on here. So if you’re from Germany, and you, y’know, speak German, you might want to try to get answers to your questions by checking out German websites yourselves.

Again, if you know of anyone who might be interested in these events, I’d be delighted if you could share this new information with them.

I’ll be seeing many of you soon…

pat

P.S. Stay tuned for some events happening here in the US….

Posted in travel abroad | By Pat25 Responses

German Book, German Tour (And Austria)

[Edit (3/4/15): There’s updated info for these events in this blog so be sure to check it out…]

So today (Feb 21st) The Slow Regard of Silent Things hits the shelves in Germany.

Rothfuss_Musik_Stille_3d_4c(Woo! New cover!)

As usual, this book is significantly larger than its English counterpart. I haven’t gotten to see one in person yet, but in this photo mock-up they seem to be able to fit my name and the title horizontally on the spine. So that indicates that the book has undergone its typical 40% growth from being translated into German. (A phenomenon I mentioned in a blog a couple years back.)

Despite the fact that the post office is slow delivering my copy, I’ll be getting to see a copy of this book in person soon. In fact, I hope to be seeing a lot of them, as I’m going to be making a trip to Germany and Austria next month.

Here’s the schedule:

March 13-14  – Leipzig Book Fair

March 14 – Leipzig

March 16 – Berlin

March 17 – Cologne (Koln)

March 18 – Reutlingen 

March 20 – Vienna, Austria

As you can see, there are a lot of opportunities to catch me on this trip and witness my catastrophically inept attempts to speak German.

  • Details about the Events:

Though we’re calling most of these events “Readings” most of them are actually going to be readings combined with Question and Answer periods, followed by signings.

That said, each event is different, and I highly recommend you take a close look at the details of the event you’re thinking of attending to make sure you understand what’s really happening there.

Will you need a ticket? Will you need to reserve a place at the signing?

Honestly? I don’t know. It’s just my job to show up at these things and look pretty….

  • Concerning where I’m going and/or not going:

Do I wish I could do more events? Yes. But there’s only so much time in the world. I can’t hit major city in the country. Not even a quarter of them.

So before y’all start screeling things like “Why don’t you come to Frankfurt!!!1!” Please keep in mind that I’m already traveling more than 6,500 kilometers to get into your neighborhood. Globally speaking, I’m going to be right next door. If you’d really like to see me, why don’t you and your friends have a road trip and come the last 150 kilometers on your own?

C’mon. You know you want to have a road trip….

  • A Warning:

I don’t know when I’ll be back in Germany. But it probably won’t be for at least a couple years. This is fair warning. If you’d really like to hear me speak and get your book signed, this is the time to do it.

  • An Apology:

Originally, I had one more event in Heidelberg, and I know a few people got tickets and made plans before it was cancelled.

I’m incredibly sorry about that.

Some personal matters came up, and I had to change plans. I feel really bad about it.

In an attempt to make things right, everyone who was signed up for Heidelberg was offered tickets to the event in Reutlingen. What’s more, that event will also be live streamed, so you can see me, even if you can’t be there in person. (I’ll be posting the link to the livestream here, on twitter, and on facebook when we have it.)

{Fancy placeholder for eventual livestream link}

  • A Request:

As you can see, I’m announcing these events about 3 weeks ahead of time. What’s more, I’m painfully aware that a *lot* of the people who might be interested in attending don’t read my blog, or don’t speak English.

So if you know anyone who’d like to attend but might not know about it, I’d deeply appreciate it if you’d clue them in.

Thanks everybody,

pat

P.S. For those of you who are here in the US, and feeling all ensaddened because none of these events are for you.

Here’s two shows I have coming up with Paul & Storm and Joel Hodgson that I have coming up. (And yes, I just got a bit of a tingle when I typed that last bit.)

3/26 Portland http://bit.ly/NMPortland 

3/27 Seattle http://bit.ly/NMSeattle

I’ll be making a more elaborate posting about this later, but I thought I might want to throw this up sooner rather than later for those of you who like to plan your lives in advance a bit.

We’re going to be bringing in other guests, too, so you might want to grab your tickets sooner rather than later….

Also posted in book covers, signing books | By Pat81 Responses

FAQ: Why haven’t you been posting on your blog?

Well, it looks like this blog isn’t going to write itself, so I guess I should just get it over with. Like tearing off a Band-Aid….

My dad has cancer.

That’s the reason I haven’t been writing in the blog for the last two months. It’s also the reason that I’ve canceled the European book tour I had planned for November.

That’s the short version. There’s more details below for people who want them.

Why am I writing about this on my blog?

1. I feel like people deserved an explanation.

When I canceled my European tour, it ended up inconveniencing and disappointing a lot of people. I had signings and interviews set up in England, France, The Netherlands, Germany, and Spain.

I figured I owed them more than a vague, “Mr. Rothfuss had to cancel due to personal reasons.”

Along similar lines, I haven’t been good about answering my e-mail these last couple months. There have been long delays and lost messages. A lot of you send in cool pictures for the photo contest and never saw the results that I’d promised on the blog.

I figured y’all deserved an explanation too….

2. To prevent gossip and rumormongoring.

When I stopped posting on my blog, the Facebook fan page, and Google+ people started asking questions. They wrote posts and sent me e-mails asking what was up. Not long after that, people started posting theories about what was wrong, where I was, what I was doing….

I knew that if I just came back after two months of silence and pretended like nothing happened, there would be *more* questions and guesses. So I’m deciding to nip it all it the bud by giving y’all the honest truth.

What kind of cancer does he have?

Lung cancer.

Those of you who have been reading the blog for a long time might remember the blog that I wrote a couple years ago where I talked about… well… a lot of things. Including the fact that my mom was diagnosed with lung cancer in the fall of 2006, and that she died about five months later, a couple weeks before The Name of the Wind first hit the shelves.

While that was happening, my dad was diagnosed with lung cancer too. In January of 2007 he went into the hospital to have two thirds of his lung removed.

Since then, we’ve been keeping our fingers crossed, hoping that his cancer was gone for good. Every six months he’d go in for a scan, and we’d hold our breath until the results came back, letting us know that he was clean. He passed the one year mark, the two year mark, but we knew until he hit 5 years, he wasn’t really considered “cancer free.”

We almost made it. But this summer, when we were coming up on our 4.5 year mark, something showed up on his adrenal gland. It took a lot of testing to be sure, but now we know that it’s the lung cancer that’s come back.

Essentially, it’s like this:

(For some of you, this image is going to be cut off. Just click on it to see the whole thing.)

[I’ve mentioned XKCD on the blog before, and I’m guessing the vast majority of you already read it. It’s one of my absolute favorite comics. And I dearly hope I’m not overstepping the bounds of politeness or the creative commons license by reposting the image here.

If you don’t read it, you really should. The author, Randall Munroe, in addition to having vasty stores of smarts and humor, has a profound talent for clear visual depictions of abstract concepts. I would hire him to map out the snarly meta-layered skein that is the plot of my trilogy, (it would make a really cool poster) but I’m guessing he has better things to do.]

How bad is it?

The cancer is: “treatable but not curable.” Which sounds nicer than “terminal,” but means pretty much the same thing.

That said, things could be worse. We Rothfi are hardy stock. We could get lucky. What’s more, the cancer has taken its sweet time coming back, and its moving slowly. These are both things I have come to admire in a cancer.

My dad is just starting his second week of chemo, and it’s going pretty well. No huge side effects. He’s feeling pretty good. He still plays golf and hangs out with Oot.

So what now?

Now I go back to writing the blog pretty much the same way I did before. Which is to say I’m going to mostly dick around, tell stories, and amuse myself.

I might talk about how things are going with my dad if I feel like it, but I don’t expect it to be a regular thing.

What can I do to help?

I’m putting an answer to this question up because, as a group, y’all endlessly surprise me by being amazingly decent human beings. And I know if I don’t address this here in the blog, I’ll probably get several dozen e-mails (if not several hundred) offering help of various sorts.

So let me say in advance: Thanks. I appreciate the offer, but odds are unless you’re an oncologist who specializes in adenocarcinoma, we’re covered.

I’ve turned off the comments on this post for the simple reason that I don’t have any desire to read comments. It’s not that I don’t want to hear your well-wishings, it’s that I don’t want to host a discussion on this topic right now. Doesn’t sound like a ton of fun to me.

If you *really* want to send some well-wishings, you can drop a card to my P.O. box, and I’ll pass it along to my dad.

You can address it to:

Grandfather Sir
PO BOX 186
Stevens Point, WI 54481

And that’s all for now.

Thanks for your patience, everyone. And stay tuned. I’ve got a large backlog of blogs built up, and I’ll be posting them up pretty quickly.

Also, this year’s Worldbuilders is on the way. We’ve got some cool things coming with that….

pat

Also posted in Fuck Cancer, Rage, things I shouldn't talk about | By PatComments closed

A Love Note to Germany (And Other Things)

Okay. There’s been a flurry of excited messaging ever since I mentioned I’d be making a trip to Europe, and was willing to sign books while I’m over there. Details are over here on the previous blog.

Here are a few general comments and some answers to questions in response to the hubbub.

To my German Readers:

Oh my German readers. I do love you. I love you with a fierce love that is big as the sky. I know there are many of you. I know you would like me to stop in your country and sign books and do various authory things.

Do not think that I scorn you. Do not think that I neglect you. Do not think I fail to appreciate you, because I do. It is because of you that I can now legitimately call myself “International Bestselling Author” Patrick Rothfuss.

Before that, I was forced to call myself merely “Skilled Lover of Women” Patrick Rothfuss or “That Strange Guy Who Sits in the Back of the Coffeeshop All the Time” Patrick Rothfuss.

I appreciate this. You must believe me. I love you.

But as for making a stop in Germany this time around. I just don’t think I’m going to be able to.

You see, Sarah, she says. “I would like to go to Rome.”

And I think, “Rome? Have they done five hardcover printings of my book in Rome? No. That was Germany. Did my book get all manner of cool reviews in Rome? No. That also was Germany. What of the swank little bookmark? Surely that was Rome? No. It was not.”

But you see, Sarah, she has this baby in her. This baby gives her remarkable powers.

I say to Sarah, “Where would you like to go on your trip to Europe?

Sarah says, “I would like to go to Rome.”

And lo. We go to Rome.

Sarah says, “Also, I would like to see Paris.”

And suddenly, it is so.

I’m not saying I’ll never visit you, Germany. I will. I promise. It’s just that when I do visit, I want everything to be perfect. I don’t want to rush this part of our relationship. I don’t want to go too fast. We need to be sure we’re both ready. I want this to be special for both of us.

Perhaps I’ll come to visit when book two is translated. Or maybe when your paperback comes out. Hopefully, if the German publishers are willing to help, we can do it up proper and I’ll hit a bunch of places all over Germany, rather than just making a two-day stop in one city.

Be patient, I love you.

Sincerely,

pat

To my readers in Dublin:

As above. I was really hoping to make it there during this trip, but it just didn’t work out. You’ll see me before too long. I promise.

To my readers in other countries:

I would love to come to Sweden. To Ireland. To Spain. To Belgium. To Estonia. To Finland. I would love to come to Russia. To the Czech Republic. To Turkey. To Wales. To Portugal….

I’m sure you can see the problem.

If you can’t see the problem, it’s this: if I went to all of these countries, I wouldn’t have time to do anything but drive around. I wouldn’t see anything except through the window of a train. It’s pure logistics. I can’t do it all this trip. Someday. Hopefully.

To people eager to help schedule a signing:

1. If you want your local bookstore to host a signing, you need to tell *them* you’re excited about it, not me. I’m already interested in doing a signing. So are you. We’re on the same page. We’ve established a rapport.

But without the bookstore it’s just not going to work out. It’s like a three-way. It doesn’t matter how much you and me want it. Without that third person, it just doesn’t work out.

2. If you have a friend/relative/lover/former roommate that works in a bookstore, and you think they’d be excited to help schedule a signing. Contact *them* about it, see if they’re really interested, then have them drop me a line if they are.

3. If you want to contact me about a potential signing, use the contact form. If you post it in the comments, I won’t know how to get in contact with you. I will be similarly helpless if you shout the information out your window, or write it on your bathroom mirror. Sad but true.

4. If your town isn’t on the list of places I’m stopping, I probably won’t be able to come out and do a signing. The possible exception to this is Manchester, as it’s on my way between London and Edinburgh. But even that depends on the interest of the local bookstore. (See #1)

That said, if you’re actually one of the folks in charge of scheduling events in a bookstore or a library, and you’d REALLY like me to stop in, you can still drop me a line.

A few quick answers:

Q: “Will I be posting up the dates, times, and places of the eventual signings?”

A: Um… Yes? Rest assured. I’ll be posting them here on the blog, and on the Tour Schedule Page.

Q: “How’s the book going?”

A: Very well. Don’t bug me about it. It harshes my vibe.

Q: “Does Sarah have any news about the baby?”

A: I just asked her. Sarah says: “It’s freaking huge.”

Q: “I live in a town in Europe! We have a bookstore! You should come here!”

A: That is not a question. Also, please see above points one through four inclusive.

Hugs and kisses,

pat

Also posted in appearances, BJ Hiorns Art, foreign happenings, Sarah, signing books | By Pat72 Responses

European Tour – a call for bookstores.

First: My Thanks

Thanks to everyone who offered their congratulations.

(I’d be more properly verbose and flowery, but I have to be brief here. I’m using borrowed internet up here in the northwoods of Wisconsin, and this place is closing in 15 minutes.)

Second: The Tour

A while back, I promised Sarah a trip to Europe. Now, with the baby coming, I’m realizing I’m going to have to either make good on that promise, or wait for years until we no longer have a newborn. Because dragging a newborn around an international trip is not cool on many levels.

So we’re going. Sarah deserves her trip for putting up with my endless bullshit.

Soon I will be turning over a solid draft of my book for my editor to read and… well… edit. This will take her a while, because the book is beastly long and she’s good at her job.

While she’s doing that, I have a window of opportunity. Rather than sit around, twiddle my thumbs, and fret over what my editor will say, I’m going to take Sarah to Europe before she gets too big with baby to do more than waddle to the fridge and make me rub her feet.

I’m looking forward to the trip. It will do me good to take a break from the book for a bit. If I don’t get a few weeks away from it in between drafts, I lose perspective.

Also, it will be nice to have a bit of a walkabout on my own before finalizing Kvothe’s own set of adventure as he goes out to make his fortune in the wide world.

Third: Sending out the Call.

For years now, I’ve had folks in the UK and the rest of Europe saying things like, “When are you going to be coming to [insert name of foreign country here]??!!?”

Well now’s the time.

I’m more that willing to do signings at the cities I’m stopping at. But since this is happening on the spur of the moment, I don’t have time to go through official bookstore channels, or perform the typical courting dances with foreign bookstores: first researching, then calling around, then playing phone tag, then trying to convince them that it would be worth their while to order a dozen of my books and set up a card table….

By the time I finished that, I’d already be back in the US.

So here’s where you come in.

I’m posting my itinerary below. What cities I’ll be and where. If you own a bookstore (or work in one) and you’d like me to come in and do a signing, lovely. Drop me a message off the contact form and we’ll set something up.

If you don’t work in a bookstore, but you know a cool one you think would be interested, ask them if they might be interested. Then, if they are, drop me a message. Or have them do it.

May 8-11 Rome

May 13-15 Amsterdam

May 17-19 Paris

May 21-25 London (And environs.)

May 27– 28 Edinburgh

May 30 Glasgow

Crap crap crap. The place is closing.

More later,

Fondly,

pat

Also posted in appearances, Sarah, signing books | By Pat128 Responses
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