Tag Archives: Dreamhaven

Many Cool Books from Dreamhaven

One of the great things about Heifer International is that they work hard to partner with groups local to the areas they’re working in. For example, in Guatemala they partnered with Green Mountain Coffee to help support families who were building sustainable, self-reliant coffee farms.

And the best way to do that was to provide honey bees to pollinate the coffee, as well as to produce delicious, sellable honey.

Improving Food Security and Nutrition of Coffee Farm Workers' Fa

There are a fair number of small-scale coffee farmers in Guatemala, but the harvest season is only 4 months, so they often have no income for the remainder of the year. This was Feliciana Martin’s biggest concern before Heifer gifted her some beehives, but she doesn’t have that worry any longer.

She collected 60 pounds of honey in the first six months and doubled the number of hives she owns. In addition to a sizeable increase in the yield of her coffee farm, which was struggling to support her and her daughter, she now has income from the honey to help pay for food, school, and medicine for her family.

Then she trained some neighbors on the proper care of bees and gave them hives to start them on their own road to increased independence. This is called “Passing on the Gift.” All Heifer recipients take part it, and it’s a big piece of what makes Heifer’s work so successful.

Martin dreams of a better life for her daughter. Now she can make that happen.

And only $30 gets a family the gift of honey bees

* * *

As an added bonus to helping a family make a better life, $30 also gets you 3 chances to win one of the fabulous books or games in our lottery.

We’ve amassed a staggering number of both via private donations, author donations, and donations from our lovely sponsors. This time around, we have a few things from DreamHaven Books in Minneapolis.

DreamHaven is a wonderful bookstore, and a small press as well. We’ve got a cool mix of books produced and published by DreamHaven, as well as some of the rare or limited books they’ve come across over the years.

  • 28 first edition copies of  The Night We Buried Road Dog by Jack Cady.

roaddog

“There’s not a bad story here. It’s easy to see why they were award winners and it’s a great volume filled with Glenn Chadbourne illustrations and a cover by Alan M. Clark. Don’t let this one get past you.” – Barry Hunter

This is a collection of short stories by the Nebula and World Fantasy Award winning author Jack Cady, who passed away back in 2004.

Greg, the owner of Dreamhaven, discovered a box full of first edition copies, and sent them all along to us.

  • 28 first edition copies of The Creature from the Black Lagoon by Vargo Statten.

creature

“This is a must-have for Creature fans and is highly recommended for horror fans who want to broaden their knowledge of this fascinating progenitor of many subsequent man-in-the-suit horrors, Dan O’Bannon’s titular Alien being the most obvious and arguably the most frightening in the cinema.” -Cinemaretro

This is the novelization of the creepy classic movie, and it features a lot of stills from the film in addition to the novel itself.

sick

“A Delightful anthology of gruesome rhyme” -The Dark Side

Anything Neil Gaiman works on is good – that’s an empirical fact. He helped edit this collection of poems that are both funny and gruesome, so there’s no way you won’t love it. Every $10 donation gets you a chance to make this book part of your collection.

  • 48 copies of Don’t Panic: The Official Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Companion by Neil Gaiman.

panic

“Certainly the most outstandingly brilliant book to have been written about The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy since this morning” -Douglas Adams

A lot of people don’t realize that before Gaiman did fiction, he was a journalist. And this is one of his earliest books – published in 1988, it was his second book, after, I am not joking, a Duran Duran biography.

  • 22 first edition copies of Shelf Life, Edited by Greg Ketter.

shelflife

“[Shelf Life] is laugh-out-loud funny. Bookshop owners and habitués will appreciate the palpable affection for literary havens.” -Publishers Weekly

Greg is the owner of DreamHaven, and he’s put together a collection of stories about bookstores. This is the original hardcover printing with 5 bookstore-centered stories, and an introduction by Neil Gaiman.

It’s something that’s close to all of our hearts, I’d guess, and 22 of them have been put into the lottery.

* * *

The finish line is in sight, folks. We’ve rounded the corner, and are on the straightaway.

All of our auctions are ending Sunday night, so if you’ve been waiting to snipe something, now’s the time. There won’t be any more added before the fundraiser is over.

If you want to get an entry (or 3) into the lottery, you get one for every $10 you donate on our fundraising page. $30 get you three entries in the lottery and a family gets honey bees. $60 is enough to buy a family fruit trees, plus you get six entries in the lottery. $120 gets you twelven entries and one of my favorite donations: a goat.

And there’s only a few more days you can get something from The Tinker’s Packs and be sure it’ll arrive in time for Christmas. We have books, games, t-shirts, scarves, and even a stuffed owlbear, all of which could make someone very happy as a holiday gift.

Enjoy your weekend, folks. And keep spreading the word. We can’t do this without you.

Posted in Worldbuilders 2015 | By Pat7 Responses

Signed Books by Gaiman and Pratchett

Those of you who have been following Worldbuilders for a couple years will probably recognize this book.

It’s a book with a story behind it. And the story goes like this.

2008: A Gift from Gaiman.

In 2008 I was still a newbie author, hardly published for more than a year. On a whim, I decided to try raising money for Heifer International on my blog. Things quickly spiraled out of control as other authors pitched in, spreading the word about the fundraiser and donating books.

The pinnacle of the coolness/madness came when Neil Gaiman mentioned us to his vast legion of readers. He also donated a rare ARC of Stardust to the cause.

Unfortunately, mail was slow around the holidays, so we couldn’t use the book until….

2009: Stardust for the people.

We had this beautiful book. This beautiful, *rare* book. And I was having a hard time deciding how best to use it. I knew we could auction it off and raise at least a thousand dollars, maybe a couple thousand dollars, but that didn’t seem right somehow.

So I decided to put it into the lottery, that way anyone who donated to Heifer on our team page would have a chance at winning it. That seemed fair to me, more egalitarian.

At the end of the fundraiser someone wins the book. And in an amazing fit of generosity, they donate it back to Worldbuilders. Their one stipulation is that we auction it off next year, so it will bring in more money for Heifer.

2010: Stardust on the Auction Block.

During year three of Worldbuilders, we auctioned off all manner of things. And, as the previous winner requested, we put Gaiman’s copy of the Stardust ARC up on e-bay too.

After some fierce bidding it sold for over $2500 to a lovely guy named Dan. There were many high-fives in Worldbuilders central. We were sad to see the book go, but $2500 bucks buys a lot of goats.

But when I e-mailed Dan to arrange shipping, he said he wanted to donate the book back to Worldbuilders.

I asked Dan if he was sure. He said he was sure. I asked Dan how he got to be so cool, and he said he was inspired by the story of how last year’s winner re-donated the book.

But most of the credit, he said, should go to his mom. She always made a point of donating to charity even though she never had a lot of money. Not only that, but she was a died-in-the-wool geek like the rest of us: she read fantasy and sci-fi, she played Infocom games…

From everything I’ve heard, she sounds like my kind of lady.

Dan told me she had passed away recently, and that most of the money he inherited from her went into buying this book. He thinks she would be proud and happy to know that the money will go to helping as many people as possible through Heifer.

Dan also said that he was a big Gaiman fan, and that he hoped that this whole exchange didn’t give Gaiman a complex because nobody would keep his book….

His only stipulation was that we put the book back into the lottery next year, so anyone can win it….

2011: Full Circle.

 

We put the ARC back in the lottery to much cheering. After picking the prizes, I call the winner, Maayan, to set up shipping (because you don’t want something like this to be a surprise on a doorstep).

Maayan tells me no.  She wants it back in the fundraiser.  It’s sort of a thing now.

So I send her a box of books as a “Thanks for being cool” present.

And now we go back to our roots. It’s back in the lottery, where anyone can win it.

  • A rare, numbered ARC of Stardust.  Signed by Neil Gaiman.

This beautiful book comes with its own slipcase.  Numbered 28 out of 250.  Signed.

Rest assured that the book is in immaculate shape. It’s been cocooned in bubble wrap for years. If you win it, you can finally give it a loving home, and Neil can sleep a little sounder knowing that someone out there has finally claimed his book.

All it takes is a donation chance of winning it if you donate at least $10 to Heifer International on our team page by January 21st.

*     *     *

Only one person can win the Stardust ARC, so this year we’re putting in some extra Gaiman items to spread the joy around. Some are auctions, some are in the lottery.

We have some books and posters signed by Pratchett, too. And this seems like a good place to put them, given that we’ve got a copy of Good Omens signed by both Pratchett *and* Gaiman up for grabs too.

  • Stardust, Fragile Things, and Neverwhere audio books by Neil Gaiman.

If you haven’t ever heard Neil Gaiman read his own work, you owe it to yourself to make that happen. Someday I hope to be half the narrator he is.

How good is he? Well, we listened to Neverwhere on the drive back from ChiCon last summer, and it kept Oot transfixed and quiet for hours.  So it’s practically magic.

  • Telling Tales and Speaking in Tongues audio CDs by Neil Gaiman.

These are a bit more rare.  They were published Dreamhaven Books, which makes them extra cool, and also means that’s really the only place you can get them easily.

Or, you could donate some money to the Team Page and have a chance to win them while making the world suck less.

  • Auction: Warning: Contains Language audio CD.  Signed by Neil Gaiman.

This CD was also published by Dreamhaven. It’s got a bunch of stuff from his Angels & Visitations collection, with music provided by illustrator/director/all around renaissance man Dave McKean. There’s even a hidden track, but don’t worry. It’s not too hidden.

To bid on this auction, head over here.

“Set in ancient Japan, this story is a haunting fable of ill-fated love and dream-eating monsters, told in an illustrated text format, and painted by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano.”

  • Auction: An Evening with Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer poster.  Signed by Neil Gaiman.

(Lead weights not included.  Those are mine and I need them. Because.  Because reasons)

Here’s something cool.  It’s a promotional poster from the tour Neil and Amanda did. These weren’t easy to get at the time, and odds are if someone has one now, they’re probably going to keep it.

Added Bonus? It’s fuzzy.  I want to touch it, but Maria keeps slapping my hand away.

To bid, click here for the auction.

Gaiman has done some great kids books besides Coraline.  This is one of them.  It’s not quite as dark as Coraline, but Odd is no less clever.  Some day Oot will meat a bear, a fox and an eagle, and I know he’ll be prepared for his adventure because of this book.

“Using several figures from Norse mythology, Gaiman has written a thoughtful and quietly humorous fantasy that younger Percy Jackson fans will enjoy.” – Library Journal

  • The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish.  Signed and doodled by Neil Gaiman.

Kids trade the darndest things. I only hope that if Oot trades me off for something that he’s savvy enough to get more than a couple goldfish.  I’d like to think I’m worth at least an iguana or two.  Or one of those brightly colored, poisonous frogs, the kind you use for lickin’.

“A bittersweet, guffaw-out-loud story from the most distinctive partnership in picture books today.” – The Guardian

 

Blueberry Girl is an awesome children’s book that encourages unconventional girls to keep it up.  As usual, Gaiman manages to be relentlessly inspiring without being saccharine.  If you know anybody who happens to have a daughter, be a daughter, or be at all human, you may need to get this for them.  Crazy Hair is goofy and weird and awesome.  It involves hair, something I’m pretty familiar with.  It also must be read out loud, even if you’re by yourself.

“Fans of Gaiman and Vess will pounce on this creation; so too will readers who seek for their daughters affirmation that sidesteps traditional spiritual conventions.” – Publishers Weekly

“Provoking questions about what it is to be free in thought and form, this is a work of unique luminescence that may well change the way hair is looked at forever” – The Bookseller

The auction for Blueberry Girl is here.  The auction for Crazy Hair is here.

Here we have a children’s book from Discworld that Pratchett references in the book Snuff. I honestly didn’t know it even existed until it showed up for the fundraiser. I guess that makes me a bad fan.

Given how much I liked his other discworld children’s book: “Where is my Cow?” I’m eager to read this one, too.

Click here and bid on it.

Some of y’all may not have seen what Terry Pratchett does when he signs books.  He’s got a stamp AND a cool foil sticker.  I wish I had thought of something like this.

(Click to Embiggen)

This book is super awesome.  It’s rare, first edition, and double signed.  And it’s in the lottery. Only donors can win it.

This, however, is not in the lottery.  We got some really cool Pratchett/Kidby art this year, and this print is one of the coolest.

To bid on the print, click here.

Discworld is something everyone needs to read at some point.  If not all of them, at least a few.

A good place to start is here, with the first one that was published.  It even has a decent mini-series you can watch as well.  Though, as always, the book is better.

This copy is even the UK edition.  It has a “u” in “colour” so you know it’s fancy.

And here it is.  The big one.  A double signed, UK edition of Good Omens.  This has a beautiful dust jacket that represents both the angel and demon characters. Signed by Pratchett and Gaiman both.

If you want to bid on it, you should click here.

*     *     *

You should make sure to make your donation on the Worldbuilders Team Page by January 21st. For every $10 you pitch in, you get another chance to win thousands of books and DVD’s.

You can view all of our current auctions over here to check on all of our last-minute awesome that needed to get out.

If you want to see the other items that have been donated to Worldbuilders, or learn more about the fundraiser itself, you can head over to our main page.

Posted in Stardust ARC, Worldbuilders 2012 | By Pat37 Responses

Meeting Terry Pratchett

So as I mentioned yesterday, while I was at NADWcon this weekend, I got the chance to get a book signed by Terry Pratchett.

The thought of getting a book signed is an odd one to me. In these last several months, it’s possible that I’ve signed thousands of books. Many thousands. I’ve signed books to families, to kids, to grandparents. I’ve signed books in warehouses, libraries, bookstores, and colleges….

But honestly, I don’t know if I’ve ever approached someone to get their autograph. Not in a formal setting. And certainly not anyone of Terry Pratchett’s status. Not someone I’ve been reading since I stumbled onto a copy of Sourcery in Shopko in 1989….

By the time Monday rolled around, I’d been at the convention for three solid days. And truth be told, I was kinda hoping that I might run into Terry at some point in that time. Maybe we’d be in the elevator together. Maybe we’d meet in the hallway on the way to a panel. Maybe someone would introduce us and I’d get a chance to say a few words….

But it didn’t happen. I wasn’t surprised or disappointed. I know how these things work. It’s a big con, and Terry’s the star of the show. They have to work hard to protect the Guest of Honor at events like this or they’re mobbed by fans. If they aren’t careful, a guest like Terry will have a hard time finding a moment’s peace to eat. I’ve seen some titan-level writers who have trouble simply walking down a hallway at a con without a handful of people asking for an autograph or a picture.

So I didn’t stalk Pratchett. I didn’t arrange an introduction, or just happen to bump into him somewhere. Even when I found out that his room was right next to mine in the hotel, I didn’t do anything like leave a copy of The Princess and Mr. Whiffle outside his door. I didn’t want to be that guy.

The signings were carefully controlled, too. They have to be. Terry has written more than 50 books, and everyone there would like nothing more than to get a bunch signed. If they let everyone get as many books signed as they’d like, Terry would have spent the entire length of the four-day convention signing books.

I’m not being hyperbolic here. It’s the literal truth. He could easily have spent 70 hours signing books if the convention didn’t work hard to control the situation.

This is something I understand only now that I’ve been on my first signing tour.

Take me, for example. I’m a newbie author. I have two books out (compared to Pratchett’s 50+). I’ve been published for four years (compared Pratchett’s 40.)

To put this in different terms, I am currently hovering around 2300 Gaiman-Day units of cool, which isn’t bad.

But Pratchett probably ranks in at more than 60,000. I mean, when you write so well they actually knight you, you’re kind of a big deal.

Despite my relatively newbie nature, when I showed up in Houston back in March, I signed books for 9 hours straight. Given that I’m about 2% of a Pratchett, you can see how quickly one of his signings could spiral into madness if it wasn’t carefully controlled.

My point is, I knew Pratchett wasn’t going to be signing books all higgledy piggledy at the con. Even if he signed a single book for every person there, it would take him 12 hours. Because of that, I knew I probably wasn’t going to have a chance to get anything signed.

That said, I was pleasantly surprised when the guest liaison for the convention told me that if I wanted, he might be able to pull a few little strings for me. Maybe enough for me to get a book signed. Maybe.

I was honest, and said I’d be grateful for the chance. If I could get a book signed, I’d be able to use it for the charity I run every year.

He said that if the book was for charity, we could almost certainly make it happen.

So I bought a copy of Nation from Dreamhaven in the dealer’s room, and on Monday, I wandered to the hall where Terry was signing. He was mostly autographing stuff items that had been sold at the charity auction the day before. I’d had to miss the auction because I was doing some paneling. But it was probably for the best, as I’d already spent more money than I should on swag.

The guest liaison motioned me over and told me it was cool if I got something signed. It really didn’t have to be for the charity, either, he said. I could just get something for myself.

Suddenly I was really conflicted. I’d brought a copy of Where’s My Cow? to the convention, because whenever we travel with Oot, we need to bring about a dozen books to keep him happy. (He’s like his dad that way.)

I’ve been reading Where’s My Cow? to Oot since before he could talk. It’s a great book, and the ending makes me a little weepy, because I’ve turned into a total soppy git ever since I became a dad.

Oot knows what noises the animals make, even the  Hippopotamus. He really likes the page with Coffin’ Henry on it, too, and asks to see it again and again.

He also enthusiastically says, “Buggrit!” Which is a little troubling to Sarah, but pleases me to no end.

So when the guest liaison says I can get any book signed, I realize I have Where is My Cow? in my backpack. I could get Pratchett to sign the book to Oot….

It’s a hard moment, but I decide to get Nation signed for Worldbuilders instead. Because personal isn’t the same as important. The signed book will be a nice draw for Worldbuilders if we throw it into the general mix of prizes. And if we auction it, I’m guessing it will bring in at least a couple hundred bucks. That’s enough for a couple of goats….

I consider trying to get both signed, of course. Because I’m only human. Terry is a nice guy, and accommodating, so I’m guessing if I pulled a second book out of my bag when I was at the table he’d go for it….

But I shake off the thought fairly quickly. I am not a special snowflake. I don’t deserve to get two books signed when everybody else gets one. If everyone tried to pull that shit, Terry would have an extra 2000 books to sign.

The guest liaison brings me up to the table and introduces me, explaining that I’m fellow author and that I’ve hit the New York Times with both my books. That’s nice of him. It lets me stand a little taller.

Terry looks up at me and says, “I’m guessing you’re fantasy, not science fiction.”

I grin and nod. “We do have a certain look, don’t we?”

I’m pleasantly surprised by the fact that I don’t feel terribly tongue-tied or shaky or awkward.

[Author’s note: Sarah just brought Oot in after his shower. He grinned at me and, “Bugit! … Hand and shrimp! Fow Ron!” (This will only make sense if you’ve read a lot of Discworld or Where’s My Cow?)]

I hand over the copy of Nation and say, “This book was absolutely gorgeous. It might be the best book I’ve ever read.”

“I got a lot of letters from children,” Terry says. “They were upset because it didn’t have a happy ending.”

He opens the book and signs his name. His signature is way loopier than mine.

Terry keeps talking as he signs, “But I always reply, ‘It has a ending. It has the right ending.”

“It has the perfect ending,” I say. “It was beautiful. It absolutely broke my heart.”

And that was it. I moved away and made room for the rest of the folk who had things for him to sign.

Would I have liked to talk longer? Maybe chat about writing and the art of ending? Of course. Who wouldn’t?

But there’s only so much time. And honestly, I was happy to wrap things up before I accidentally made an ass of myself.

Besides, though Pratchett didn’t know it, he’s said about the best thing possible to me. I worry about the ending of my story sometimes. I worry that people won’t like it. Most of my readers are hoping for a particular type of ending. They e-mail me with their theories and their hopes. They want X to hook up with Y. They want Z to get his comeuppance. They want such and such story tied up in a certain way….

I know it comes from a place of love. But it makes me nervous.

After talking to Terry, I’m less nervous. I can’t give each of you your own personalize ending, containing everything you specifically wanted out of the story. That’s impossible.

But I can give you the right ending. A perfect ending.

That’s all for now. If you have a spare moment, send a good thought this way tomorrow.

I don’t want to give any specifics, but tomorrow is going to be a little rough for us. If everything goes well it won’t be a big deal. But still, if you have a spare thought, Oot and Sarah and I could use it, just for luck.

Later,

pat

Posted in conventions, meeting famous people, Oot, signing books, Tales from the Con, Things I didn't know about publishing | By Pat100 Responses

Minnneapolis makes me sick….

When I got a stomach flu before heading out to Minneapolis on the 21st of April, I was willing to pass it off as inconvenient coincidence. But after I headed out last weekend to do signings at Dreamhaven and Uncle Hugo’s, I came back with a nasty head cold.

That’s twice. When something happens twice in a row, I’m pretty sure it’s science.

Despite this, Minneapolis seems like a really nice place. Plenty of coffee shops and the streets are in a lovely grid pattern that makes them very easy to navigate. That’s something you can take for granted if you grow up in a city like Madison, which is built on an ismus, and doesn’t have 100 meters of straight road in the entire city limits.

I made it to both bookstores on time. I had fun chatting with folks, didn’t misspell any names, and the folks at Uncle Hugo’s gave me Pocky.

Because of this trip, people who would like to buy signed copies of the book online can get them from Dreamhaven. Not only will they let you pick which cover you want, but if you order from them before the 20th, you can get me to personalize it when I meet up with them again at Wiscon.

After two signings, a radio interview, and a business dinner with two cool grad students who are putting together a fantasy conference at the University, I was pretty shagged out. My publisher had generously offered to pay for a hotel room Saturday night. (Their exact quote was, “We don’t want to you die before you finish editing book two.”) However, I figured I would push on through and save them the money.

That’s when things started to get interesting. Around 1:30 in the morning, I missed my turn-off and drove 40 miles in the wrong direction. Then I try to navigate the back roads trying to fix my route without backtracking.

So of course I get pulled over by a cop because I’m going too fast for the back roads. But he’s actually really cool and lets me go without a ticket. What’s more, he tells me that there’s a bridge out ahead, and tells me a quicker way to get around it than the official detour.

So I drive the remaining 90 miles home on the back roads. I saw two skunks, a possum, and 23 deer. Seriously. 23. It was actually kind of fun because it gave me an excuse to honk the horn a lot. And honking your horn is kinda fun if you’re sleep deprived at three in the morning. Or if you never really grew up in the first place and just enjoy honking it. Or both.

So I call it a successful trip. Cop, but no ticket. Deer, but no wreck. Detour, but not by much. Pocky. Horn. And I got to meet cool people and talk about my book. It was pretty much the perfect day.

pat

Posted in appearances | By Pat5 Responses

Heading to Minneapolis: Take II

Alright, barring another bout of food poisoning, significant natural disaster, or some especially portentous omens, I will be heading up to Minneapolis this Saturday.

I’ll be at Uncle Hugo’s from 1-3. I’ll be signing books and generally just hanging around. I’m also planning on being witty, but that is largely contingent on whether or not I’m able to find a coffee place on my way to the store. Without coffee, I’ll have to settle for looking charmingly bewildered, quickly fading into sluggishness, incoherence, and death.

After that I’m going to be doing a gorilla signing at Dreamhaven. By this I mean I intend to show up and thump violently at my chest to establish my alpha male status. This plan is also contingent on finding a coffee shop after leaving Hugo’s. Without caffeine I expect my ploy for primacy will fail. If that’s the case you’ll probably find me submissively grooming one of the burlier cashiers. Baring that, I’ll probably be lurking around, signing stock somewhere in the store between 3:30-4:30.

This means if you really want a signed copy of the book, you can now order it online from Dreamhaven. What’s more, you can even have me personalize it, if you order before Saturday and include what you want me to write when you order the book.

In other news, I’ll be making updates to the page in the next couple days. We’re going to post up several interviews, podcasts, and reviews that have been accumulating over the last couple weeks. I’ll also be updating the tour schedule page. So stay tuned….

pat

Posted in appearances | By Pat11 Responses

A change in today’s book signing plans.


The plan for today was for me to drive up to Minneapolis and do signings at Uncle Hugo’s and
Dreamhaven.

Unfortunately, I seem to have come down with some sort of flu bug, or a case of food poisoning, or I have angered some sort of vengeful old testement god. It’s been a rough night, and even if the storm has passed, and I hope has, I just can’t make it. If there’s one thing worse than being violently ill, it’s being violently ill during a four hour drive to Minneapolis.

Plus, for all I know, this might be contageous. Quite aside from the fact that I don’t want to make people sick in general, I’m doubly horrified by the thought of people getting sick after meeting me and buying my book. For some reason I can picture this experience written up as a review on Amazon:

I met Pat at Uncle Hugo’s, where I bought his book and got it signed. He’s a nice guy with a warm handshake, but you can tell he’s passionate about his writing by the fevored glint in his eye. I started reading The Name of the Wind as soon as I got home. The first fifty pages were great. The second fifty were even better. Then my guts clenched and I spent eight hours hunched over my toilet cursing the name of the only author who has ever made me physically ill with his writing. Negative three stars.


I’m sorry for all of you who were planning on attending. But I’m hoping to reschedual as soon as possible. Maybe even next weekend. I’ll post something up here as soon as we manage to set that up.

pat

Posted in Alerts, appearances | By Pat8 Responses
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