Tag Archives: Jay Lake

Hundreds of Books From Subterranean Press

This is a Worldbuilders blog.

Once again the lovely folks at Subterranean Press have sent us hundreds of books. Many of them rare or out of print, and all of them are gorgeous and lovingly crafted.

Let’s take a look….

You all know who Ray Bradbury is, right? We don’t need to talk about that.

And if you’re reading this blog, you have to already understand how big a deal Fahrenheit 451 is. I’m sure of that, too.

This book brings together 16 vintage Bradbury stories and novellas that chart the evolution of the images, ideas, and social concerns that found their purest, most potent expression in Fahrenheit 451. […]  it is both an invaluable Bradbury sourcebook and a unique, intimate glimpse into the mysteries of the creative process.”

From Publishers Weekly (Pick of the Week, Starred Review): “An essential addition to the bookshelf of every Bradbury fan, the collection is also accessible to curious readers with a taste for the dark, the strange, and the macabre.”

I’ll admit that I didn’t know about this book (and the one directly below) before they were donated, but now I’m going to have to have to read them as soon as I have time. Sooner maybe.

These books are *very* new, so there aren’t many reviews yet. Instead, here’s a brief description from Sub Press:

“In paired novellas, award-winning authors Tobias Buckell and Paolo Bacigalupi explore a shared world where magic is forbidden and its use is rewarded with the axe. A world of glittering memories and a desperate present, where everyone uses a little magic, and someone else always pays the price.”

Bacigalupi is already well-known for his award winning novel The Windup Girl which was named by TIME Magazine as one of the ten best novels of 2009, and also won the Hugo, Nebula, Locus, Compton Crook, and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards.

In short, he pretty much won everything with that book. Personally, I think he’s probably a witch.


While he might not be a witch, Buckell has his share of accolades as well. He’s a Writers of The Future winner and a Campbell Award finalist. Reviewers have called Buckell “a dazzling new voice” (Robert J. Sawyer) and “an exciting new writer” (Cory Doctorow.)

From the description of The Executioness by Sub Press:

“Magic has a price.

In Khaim, that price is your head if you’re found using it. For the use of magic comes with a side effect: it creates bramble. The bramble is a creeping, choking menace that has covered majestic ancient cities, and felled civilizations. In order to prevent the spread of the bramble, many lose their heads to the cloaked executioners of Khaim.”

It’s been forever since I’ve seen two authors writing in a shared world. This is cool stuff, and I’m excited to read it.

This is one of those books I’m tempted to steal from the fundraiser. I’m a big fan of Brett’s work, and I missed my chance to buy this from Sub Press. Now it’s sold out and would cost me hundreds of dollars.

From Blood of the Muse:

“If The Painted Man was a Director’s Cut DVD, The Great Bazaar and Other Stories would be the second disc filled with all the Extras. More story, deleted scenes, a ward grimoire; it’s all here. […] Fans of The Painted Man will love The Great Bazaar and Other Stories. People not familiar with Brett’s work will find this a great introduction.”

This book isn’t published yet, which means y’all can still pre-order it from Sub Press. If you want a copy, that might be a good idea, as I’m expecting it to sell out like the book up above.

From Sub Press:

“Return to the world of The Warded Man and The Desert Spear in an illustrated new novella by Peter V. Brett. […]  Arlen Bales is seventeen, an apprentice Messenger in brand new armor, about to go out for the first time alongside a trained Messenger on a simple overnight trip. Instead Arlen finds himself alone on a frozen mountainside, carrying a dangerous cargo to Count Brayan’s gold mine, one of the furthest points in the duchy.”

Here’s another out-of-print treasure from Sub Press. These signed, leather-bound, numbered books are worth hundreds of bucks on the collector’s market.

I love Butcher’s Dresden Files and really enjoyed this story. I was surprised, but pleased, when I discovered it wasn’t from Harry’s point of view. The story follows Thomas Raith instead, and gives cool insight into his character.

Rob H. Bedford for SFFWorld says, “Backup is a solid entry to the background of the Dresden Files, a terrific story in and of itself, and the book itself looks to be a great collector’s item for both fans of Butcher’s Dresden Files or of good storytelling matched up with terrific art. Obviously from what my review says, I’d highly recommend Backup.”

This was nominated for an Eisner award, so you know it’s got some mojo.

Publishers Weekly says, “This first of hopefully several volumes delivers on all counts, boasting a solid story bolstered by exceptional work from Chilean artist Rodriguez….”

From Subterranean Press:

“The three Locke children–survivors of a horrific home invasion that claimed their father–have just begun to rebuild their lives when little Bode discovers a key with an incredible power. […] Written by Hill and featuring the mind-bending art of Gabriel Rodriguez, the second installment of Locke & Key is one head-trip you won’t forget.”

Now out-of-print, A Fantasy Medley features stories by Kelley Armstrong, Kate Elliott, C.E. Murphy, and Robin Hobb.

From Publishers Weekly (Starred Review): “Four fantasy heavyweights contribute original tales featuring intriguing female protagonists to this enthralling anthology.”

From The Agony Column: Deadman’s Road is generously illustrated by the incredibly talented Glen Chadbourne with lots of his ultra-detailed pen-and-ink drawings. [….] There’s a real sense of class and detail and craft combined with truly disturbing horror and, ever present, Lansdale’s unmatched sense of fun. Stepping into this book is like stepping into an old theater, running a black and white film you’ve never seen before.”

They say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover…. but damn, that’s a really nice cover.

Jay Lake is one of those writers that makes me look like a chump, turning out one quality book after another.

The San Francisco Book Review says, “Jay Lake is a first-class wordsmith, an author who relishes the possibilities of language, utilizing words to their utmost to craft incredibly detailed worlds both hauntingly familiar and mind-bogglingly different.”

The Library Journal says, “The author of The Engineer Trilogy has written a mesmerizing short novel that combines fictional autobiography with political intrigue and the art of the confidence man… History rewrites itself at every turn in this tale of an alchemist whose own base metal becomes, at last, pure gold.”

From Subterranean Press:

“Featuring new stories from the bestselling and brightest writers working in the genre, including: New York Times bestselling authors Scott Lynch and Garth Nix; genre greats Michael Moorcock (with an all-new Elric novella), Michael Shea (with a fully authorized new Cugel the Clever adventure), Robert Silverberg (with an all-new Majipoor tale), Glen Cook (with an all-new Black Company story), Gene Wolfe, and C. J. Cherryh; and hot new writers who’ve been re-inventing swords and sorcery like Steven Erikson, Joe Abercrombie, Tim Lebbon, and many more.”

This book should look familiar to many of you.

You can’t trust me to be objective about my own book, so here’s a quote from the San Francisco Book Review:

“In what is by far the funniest and most original book of the year (so far), Rothfuss shows off his ability to think and create outside of the expected. The story is pure comic genius that will be fun and funny for parents and children. The illustrations, not to be outdone, offer subtle little quirks that, after reading the book multiple times, shine through and give it lasting re-read incentive.”

Remember folks, for every 10 dollars you donate to Heifer International, you get a chance to win these books and hundreds of others like them. Plus there’s the whole helping make the world a better place thing. That’s nice too.

And don’t forget, I’m matching 50% of all donations made. So why not head over to my page at Team Heifer and chip in. Trust me. You’ll feel great afterward.

Or, if you want to go back to the main page for Worldbuilders, you can click HERE.

Posted in Subterranean Press, The Adventures of The Princess and Mr. Whiffle, Worldbuilders 2010 | By Pat10 Responses

A Plenitude of Signed Books

Here’s the first batch of books donated by my brethren and sistren fantasy authors. Lovely books donated by lovely people.

If you don’t know about the Worldbuilders fundraiser yet and want to know how you can win these delicious prizes, you can head over here for the details.


I’ve talked about Lev’s lovely book before on the blog. So rather than repeat myself, I think I’ll just put up a link to that blog if you’re curious about what I had to say.

But really, do you need to listen to me when George RR Martin is slinging around praise like this? “The Magicians is to Harry Potter as a shot of Irish Whiskey is to a glass of weak tea.”


Katharine Kerr donated some lovely things to the fundraiser this year. You’ll be seeing one of her manuscripts in the first round of auctions this weekend.

Kirkus Reviews says, “In this hefty tome, Kerr turns from Celtic-tinged fantasy to sweepingly far-future adventure on an alien world. The plot is built around Jezro Khan, the exiled brother of the corrupt ruler of Kazrajistan, an Islamic society… ”


Booklist says that Snares is, “..set on the borderline between sf and fantasy. It deals with Maggie Cory and the ups and downs of her and her descendants through five generations in an alternative San Francisco in which the 1960s were the prelude to a revolution… The novel has more northern California literary flavor than Kerr’s previous work, but it also features most of her superior skills at characterization, world building, and graceful language.”


From Booklist, “Kerr has written it up to her usual standard, which is among the highest for Celtic-derived fantasy sagas currently in progress. Faithful fans will be gratified, and any newcomers intrigued by this tale can retreat to its predecessors without fear of being disappointed.”

  • A hardcover set of The Iron Dragon Series: The Golden Cord and The Dragon Hunters by Paul Genesse. Signed by the author.


New York Times Bestseller Michael Stackpole says, “Taut suspense and fantastic imagery make The Dragon Hunters a tale no fantasy fan will want to miss.”


Here we have a bit of a treat. Not only is this a signed ARC of a book (Advanced Reading Copy.) But this book isn’t even out on the shelves yet. That’s right, you can use it to taunt your friends and make your enemies jealous. You can read it before it even hits the shelves, and with a blurb like the one below, you know you want to….

“SILVER is a wild combination of Indiana Jones, The Da Vinci Code, and The Omen. Read this book…before the world ends.” — Kevin J Anderson

  • A hardcover set of The Crossroads Trilogy: Spirit Gate, Shadow Gate, and Traitors’ Gate by Kate Elliott. Signed by the author.


One of my fellow DAW authors, Kate has donated a full hardcover set of her Crossroads trilogy. Fantasy Book Critic calls it “…Elliott’s best work and is highly recommended to both fans of the author and any readers who appreciate fantasy in the vein of Robin Hobb, Jacqueline Carey, and J.V. Jones…”


Publisher’s Weekly gave this one a starred review, saying, “Editor Scalzi and four well-known writers thoughtfully postulate the evolution of cities, transcending post-apocalyptic cliches to envision genuinely new communities and relationships. […] Each story shines on its own; as a group they reinforce one another, building a multifaceted view of a realistic and hopeful urban future.”


Romantic times says How Not to Make a Wish is, “Fresh and often hysterically funny, this story also has a solid emotional core. Heroine Kira’s first-person perspective keeps it all real for the reader.”

  • A copy of the uncorrected proof for Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire. Signed by the author.


Another one of those sexy ARC’s. I’ve heard good things about this one, and it’s in my own personal to-read pile. I’ve heard it referred to as fairy tale noir. I wish I could come up with a sexy description like that for my book.

Publisher’s weekly says, “Singer-songwriter McGuire adeptly infuses her debut with hardboiled sensibilities and a wide array of mythological influences, set against a moody San Francisco backdrop. October Toby Daye is half-human, half-faerie, a changeling PI with a foot in both worlds.”


Romantic Times says nightlife is: “Tightly plotted and fast-paced, this book is full of twists and turns that take the reader for one heck of a ride.”

I’ve heard this book described as, “A comedy of errors with mistaken identities ambiguous sexuality, skate god stage geeks, … and true love.” What more really needs to be said?

Well, maybe this blurb from Publisher’s weekly: “Evocative of Boy Meets Boy and Dramarama, this makes for fun, thought-provoking reading.”


“Displaying an enviable gift for pacing and action, Battles’s debut novel is a page-turner that may remind some readers of the cult TV spy series Alias… Admirers of quality espionage fiction can look forward to a new series worth following.” – Publishers Weekly

  • A hardcover copy of The Deceived by Brett Battles. Signed by the author.


BookList says, this is is a “tightly written page-turner, filled with tradecraft and offering as much action as a James Bond film… a wild ride.”

  • Three ARCs of the The Adamantine Palace by Stephen Deas. US release date: February 2010.


Stephen Deas is a hell of a nice guy. We had dinner when I was in London a while back, and the fact that I haven’t gotten around to reading his book fills me with constant shame.

Stephen also send along some of the new ARC’s for the US version of the book, as it’s not out here in the states yet. He’s also sent along a couple copies of the UK version. For people who like their color spelled colour.

  • One trade and one hardcover of The Adamantine Palace by Stephen Deas. Signed by the author.


Wait, what? He’s got a Joe Abercrombie blurb on his book? Man…. I don’t have an Abercrombie quote. Now I only feel half as guilty…

If an Abercrombie quote isn’t enough for you, Brent Weeks says it’s, “A stirring debut. Stephen Deas’s dragons are inscrutable, beautiful, magical, unstoppable… and really, really pissed off.”

Remember, every 10 dollars you donate to Heifer International gives you a chance to win these books and hundreds of others, so head over to my page at Team Heifer and chip in.

Or, if you want to go back to main page for the Worldbuilders fundraiser, you can click HERE.

With special thanks to our sponsor, Subterranean Press.

(Woo!)

Posted in Heifer International, recommendations, Subterranean Press, Worldbuilders 2009 | By Pat23 Responses
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