Tag Archives: Jim Hines

Tons of Books from DAW

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This is a Worldbuilders blog.

I love DAW with a powerful love. Not only are they the folks that took a risk on The Name of The Wind back when nobody else was much interested. But back when Worldbuilders was all fresh and dewy, they were quick to jump on board. Ever since our first year, they’ve made it a habit to shower us with lovely books.

This year is no exception. We have, quite literally, hundreds and hundreds of books from DAW this year.

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(This is not my best picture ever. My smartphone is a fairly dumb camera…)

They’ve sent us so many books, in fact, that we’re grouping them together into bundles to give them away, because doing it singly would just be unmanageable….

We’ve also got a few items we’re auctioning off at the end of the blog. Make sure to take a peek at them, too.

  • The Big Book Bundle

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DAW has never been bashful about publishing big books. Tad Williams alone is proof of that, but as you can see  from the above image, he’s in good company.

Here are nine of DAW’s delightfully hefty books, gathered together for your enjoyment, featuring Tad Williams, along with Michelle West, Irene Radford, Julie Czerneda, Sherwood Smith, Deborah J Ross, Terry A. Adams, Tanya Huff, and me.

All of them are either stand-alone or first books in a series, so you’ll be able to pick any one up and read it without being confused. It’s like a big book Whitman’s sampler.

  •  The Omnibus Collection

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This is a collection of Omnibuses (Omnibi?) by authors Mickey Zucker Reichert, Stephen Leigh, Sean Russell, Terry A. Adams, RM Meluch, S. Andrew Swann, Emily Drake, and Marjorie B. Kellogg.

Why is this awesome? Because you don’t have to worry that you’re only getting part of a series. These Omnibus editions contain *all* of the books. And since this particular prize includes every book in the picture above, it’s like you’re winning 18 books.

To read about each individual title, check out the Lottery Library on the Worldbuilders website.

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“For sheer skill in storytelling and world building, for wit, for strikingly intelligent development of the concept of telepathy, above all, for continuous concern for people, Bradley has put some more famous sagas in the shade.” – Chicago Sun-Times

This is a metric ton of Darkover books. If you’re new to the world, it might be a little daunting. Fans have two opinions about where newcomers should start: either The Bloody Sun or The Forbidden Tower, both of which are represented in this set, so either way you’re covered.

  • Set of Downbelow StationRegenesis, and Alien Space by C.J. Cherryh.

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I really enjoyed Downbelow Station. It’s a classic. I’m kinda ashamed I haven’t read the others. I’m probably going to have to fix that…

“Cherryh tantalizes our minds…captures our hearts and involves us completely…a consistently thoughtful and entertaining writer.” – Publisher’s Weekly

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This is another set that looks smaller than it is. The D’neeran Factor actually contains the novels Sentience and Master of Chaos, with Battleground being the third book in the series. DAW’s got you covered.

“Adams writes with an elaborate, intricate prose … [and] weaves an elegant tale that makes for fascinating reading.” – Locus

  • Set of Green Rider novels Kristen Britain.  Includes Green RiderFirst Rider’s CallThe High King’s Tomb, and Blackveil.

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“A fresh, well-organized fantasy debut, with a spirited heroine and a reliable supporting cast.” – Kirkus Reviews

  • Sets of Blood Price and Blood Trail by Tanya Huff.

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Did you know these books are a TV show now? If you like “Blood Ties,” treat yourself to the source material.

“An entertaining blend of warmly idiosyncratic characters, cinematic pacing and sharp-fanged humour.” – Locus

  • Set of Rosemary and RueA Local HabitationArtifical Night, and Discount Armaggedon by Seanan McGuire.

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This collection has the first three novels in the October Daye series, as well as the first novel in the Incryptid series (Discount Armageddon).  Just enough to give you a taste, and see if you’d be interested in the sequels.

“[McGuire] tells her story with energy and charm…. It’s all so much fun.” – SF Signal

  • Sets of The Four Forges and The Dark Ferryman by Jenna Rhodes.

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“The intricately plotted, character-driven saga of the Vaelinar’s desperate struggles finds anchors in folklore and legend, appealing to fans of slower pacing and detailed world building.” – Publishers Weekly

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“Roberson doesn’t take the easy way out…she has the courage and the writing ability to let her characters be true to themselves, and the result is a taut and breathless novel.” – American Fantasy

  • Starter bundles of books from DAW.

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This is a cool group of books that are either stand-alone novels, or first in a series. They were hand-picked by some of the awesome people at DAW, so you know you’re getting started with a bunch of great books.

This bundle has Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin AhmedDead Things by Stephen Blackmoore, The Silent Dragon by Irene Radford, and Silence by Michelle Sagara. And if you like Silence, its sequel, Touch, is coming up in January. Or, just a thought, you can bid on Silence and the ARC for Touch right now at our eBay auction and read it before it comes out. If you’re into that sort of thing.

  • More starter books from DAW

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Here is a second, equally cool set of books that you can just pick up and read – either stand alone novels or first in a series.

This one contains: Elisha Barber by EC Ambrose, The City of the Lost by Stephen BlackmooreMasks by EC Blake, and A  Turn of the Light by Julie Czerneda.

  • Copies of The Legend of Jig Dragonslayer Omnibus by Jim C. Hines, The Complete Keeper Chornicles Omnibus by Tanya Huff Omnibus, and The Complete Hoorka Trilogy Omnibus by Stephen Leigh.

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These are all awesome collections of great work.  I’m particularly excited to see Jim Hines in there, because not only do we have his fascinating Year of the Poser calendar in the store, but he’s also our $75,000 stretch goal….

Remember folks, we’ve got a lot of these bundles and much more to give away. And every $10 you donate through our Team Heifer page nets you a chance to win one.

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This is particularly cool, because Touch won’t be out until January.  If you win this auction, you’ll have the chance not only to read book one (Silence), but also read and finish book two (Touch) before it’s even released.

If that thought makes you all tingly inside, feel free to go bid on it.

  • Auction: One of Everything Published by DAW in 2013.

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DAW has a tradition of publishing some of the best sci-fi and fantasy in the industry. They’re good to their supporters and to their authors, in every way.

This has got a great mix of books – hardcovers, trade paperbacks, and mass market paperbacks. For example, even though The Wise Man’s Fear came out a while ago, the mass market paperback came out this year, so there’s a copy of that in there.

Don’t miss out on your chance at this many books.  Wander over and bid to your heart’s content.

* * *

If these lottery prizes look wonderful (and they do), all you have to do is donate to the Team Heifer Page for a chance to win. Feel free to swing by the Lottery Library to see all the prizes currently included.

There are also a couple of DAW-specific auctions (and some of my stuff) that will be ending on Sunday night that you can see on our eBay page.

We’re all pretty proud of our new Worldbuilders website, if you want to see why we’re strutting around a little more than usual lately.

Or, if you’re into text, there’s a lot of details about this year’s fundraiser on my blog.

Posted in Worldbuilders 2013 | By Pat19 Responses

What Should I do #7: New Authors

For the last couple months, I’ve been meaning to bring some books to your attention. I would think to myself: “Self, you should really mention this book to people your blog.”

But then I’d get busy. Or some time-sensitive piece of news would come up, like a book signing or making the New York Times list. Or I’d be distracted by something shiny, or edible, or both.

So, without further ado, here are some authors that you might not be aware of.

David Keck – In The Eye of Heaven.

I read David Keck’s book couple years back and really enjoyed it, but there is a caveat: This is not your typical fantasy novel.

We all know most fantasy novels are set in fairly generic medieval settings. The world Keck creates is different. His world is dark ages. Mankind is not on the top of the food chain, and the world is full of dangerous, mythic forces that are not to be fucked with.

At the same time the story remains very realistic. I don’t think I’ve ever read another book that does a better job of depicting the real hardships of a mercenary knight in the dark ages. His description of an injured knight going to a dentist was delightfully spot-on.

Keck’s writing style is unique as well. His descriptions are brief, almost poetic in places. Very different than the long, ponderous description that is common with so many fantasy novels these days. To use an artistic analogy: this book is more like a Monet painting than a photograph.

Because of this, the story feels almost dreamlike at times, as the main character moves back and forth between the harsh realities of tournament combat and strange dealings with otherworldly powers. I think this element of Keck’s writing caught a lot of readers unprepared, and let to some unfair reviews of his work. You don’t bitch because a Monet painting is blurry. It’s supposed to be that way, that’s the effect the artist was trying to achieve….

The second book in Keck’s series came out fairly recently (In a Time of Treason). But starting a series with the second book is not civilized behavior, and people who do it go to the special hell reserved for child molesters and people who talk in the theater.

Anyway, I really enjoyed liked it. But be warned: This is not your typical fantasy novel.

Anton Strout – Dead to Me.

As a fellow fantasy author and one of the founding members of the League of Reluctant Adults, you would think that Anton Strout would be my friend. In fact, it would be reasonable for you to assume that he has my respect and admiration.

However, nothing could be further from the truth. Strout is, among other things, my mortal enemy. The sordid details of our long-standing feud are multifarious, and I cannot in good conscience list them in a blog that children might read.

Suffice to say that I have many worthwhile reasons to scorn the man, none of which have to do with the fact that he seems to have more luck with the ladies than I do. Nevertheless, I am a gentleman, so I’ll mention his book here. Just to show that I am the better person.

I have not read his first book myself, for obvious reasons, but I’ve heard others say good things. They say that it’s urban fantasy with a strong comic twist. Charline Harris gave him a glowing blurb, so if you like her stuff, you might like his too.

Jim Hines – Goblin Quest.

One of my favorite things is when fantasy authors play with the conventions of the genre. Joss Whedon, of course, is the champion of this. The whole premise of Buffy the Vampire Slayer starts with the question, “What if that ditsy, helpless blond who gets killed in the horror movie actually kicked some ass instead of running away then falling down?”

Hines is good at playing this game too, except he asks a different question: “What do Goblins do when they’re not getting killed by adventurers?”

These are fun books. They’re lighthearted, humorous, and have some good storytelling to boot. Best of all, Hines takes the time to actually create a well-developed world for the stories to take place in, complete with a fresh cosmology, and a unique goblin culture.

Added bonus? Hines has written the next two books in the series: Goblin Hero and Goblin War. They’re already in print, so you don’t have to wait to read the rest of the series, unlike… um… some other authors. Who will remain nameless.

I think I’ll stop at three. If you want more, you can always check out my previous recommendations by clicking on the “recommendations” label down below. Elegant in its simplicity, isn’t it?

Later all,

pat

Posted in Joss Whedon, recommendations, talking shit | By Pat19 Responses
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