Tag Archives: Stephen King

Hundreds of Books from Subterranean Press

Subterranean Press has been with Worldbuilders from the very beginning. They were the first publisher to donate books to our cause, and because of that, they’ll always hold a special place in our hearts.

This year they’ve outdone themselves by donating hundreds of gorgeous, high quality books by amazing authors. Many of them are signed or limited editions. All of them are beautiful books.

Check them out.

  • 20 Numbered, limited-edition copies of Best Served Cold. Signed by Joe Abercrombie.

“The battles are vivid and visceral, the action brutal, the pace headlong, and Abercrombie piles the betrayals, reversals, and plot twists one atop another to keep us guessing how it will all come out. This is his best book yet.” — George R.R. Martin


“Once again, McCammon provides a colorful and well-researched depiction of colonial America, enlived by a rogues’ gallery of well-drawn characters. Hair’s-breadth escapes and the teasing promise that characters who appear to have been disposed of might resurface in future adventures make this a rollicking good yarn.” – Publishers Weekly

“[This collection of] six stories explore ground far from the high fantasy with which dragons are frequently associated. Fans of Shepard’s unusual and often powerful Griaule tales will be delighted to have them all in one place.” – Publishers Weekly

  • 20 Hardcover copies of Stephen King Goes to the Movies by Stephen King.

Stephen King reflects on the filming of five of his most popular short stories which were adapted into movies: The Shawshank Redemption, 1408, Children of the Corn, The Mangler, and Hearts in Atlantis.

Includes an introduction, his brief personal commentary, and behind-the-scenes insights by Stephen. What’s more, this hardcover edition includes full-color movie poster illustrations—one for each story—by Vincent Chong.

“Piracy meets politics head-on in this steampunk thriller, loosely linked to Priest’s much-lauded Boneshaker (2009). […] Though the unflinching portrayal of complex race relations is aimed at adult readers, Priest’s swashbuckling tale is also quite accessible for older teens.” –Publishers Weekly

From Publishers Weekly:“…there are enough incidents and reunions with old acquaintances to prompt Bear’s likable wampyr to insightful reflection on the shortcomings of immortality, and to espouse wisdom that comes from more than one lifetime of having to deal with mortals and their all-too-human natures.”

“Dying of the Light blew the doors off of my idea of what fiction could be and could do, what a work of unbridled imagination could make a reader feel and believe.”—Michael Chabon

“Longtime fans of Campbell’s Deepgate Codex (Scar Night, etc.) will cherish this dark little gem of a story; others will find it an excellent place to start.” – Publishers Weekly

“The end of the world has to start somewhere. In the summer of 2014, two scientific breakthroughs–one, a cure for cancer, the other, a cure for the common cold–seemed certain to change the future of mankind forever. What no one could have guessed was that these miraculous advancements would change humanity’s future by nearly bringing it to an end.”

  • 20 copies of Baba Yaga’s Daughter and Other Tales of the Old Races. Edited by C. E. Murphy
“Ranging from vignettes to novellas, these offerings grant glimpses of a much larger world, fleshing out its history and pleasing series fans.” – Publishers Weekly
  • 2 limited-edition copies of A Dance with Dragons. Signed by George R. R. Martin, illustrated and signed by Marc Fishman.


There were only about 500 copies of these signed, limited edition books printed, and they’re now sold out. But you can win a copy by donating to worldbuilders, because we’re just that cool.

“What’s A Song of Ice and Fire? It’s the only fantasy series I’d put on a level with J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. . .  It’s a fantasy series for hip, smart people, even those who don’t read fantasy.”—Chicago Tribune

  • One complete set of Subterranean Press donations.

(Not pictured above, When Will You Rise.)

We’re trying something a little experimental this year, and will be grouping some of our books into bigger prizes. That means one lucky donor win all 11 books from Subterranean Press as a prize in the lottery.

  • Auction. One complete set of Subterranean Press donations.

In addition to giving away one of each book as a prize, we’re going to auction off a full set of these books set of them to the highest bidder. That includes one of the signed, limited edition copies of A Dance With Dragons. So if you don’t want to trust your luck with the lottery, you can go bid on the full set right now.

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Remember, for every 10 dollars you donate on our Team Page, you get a chance to win these books and many, many more.

If you’d like to see all the auctions Worldbuilders is currently running, you can find them over here.

Or, if you want to see the other items that have been donated to Worldbuilders, or learn more about the fundraiser itself, you can head over to the main page here.

Posted in Subterranean Press, Worldbuilders 2012 | By Pat15 Responses

Books from Dreamhaven

This is a Worldbuilders blog.

Those of you who live in the Minneapolis area probably already know about Dreamhaven Books. For those of you that don’t know about it… well… there’s a reason I just posted that link up there. It’s for clicking. By you.

Dreamhaven is the sort of bookstore I dream about having in my town. Not only do they carry great sci-fi and fantasy, but Dreamhaven has acted as a publisher of some original works, too. They produced some of the first audio cd’s that Neil Gaiman ever recorded, as well as stuff from Peter Beagle, Larry Niven, and Gene Wolfe.

And signed books? Yeah. They have signed books.

In addition to donating a blog full of books to Worldbuilders this year, (I’ll get to those in a second) they’ve also given us a special treasure. Something rare and cool.

  • A signed, numbered, hardcover copy of A Screenplay by Neil Gaiman.

This is a screenplay Neil Gaiman wrote a long time ago. It’s an adaptation of the novel Good Omens which he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett.

This thing is a true rarity. It is the First and Only Edition of this work, numbered 409 out of 500.

According to Neil Gaiman in his introduction, this screenplay was revived from “a dusty and cobwebbed place on my hard disk, where people never go.”

Personally, I can’t think of a better item to start this year’s auctions.

This auction will run for 7 days, ending on the evening of December 22nd.

To see more pictures, or bid on this piece of raw, crystalline awesome, you can follow this link.

And now, on to the books….

  • A first edition hardcover copy of The Prince and the Pilgrim by Mary Stewart.

“Returning to the era of Arthur and his Camelot, Stewart has given life to two lesser-known characters from Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur. She enlarges upon and gives wonderful detail to Alexander, a young prince who sets off on a quest to avenge his father’s assassination and to Alice, a gentle young lass who accompanies her father on pilgrimages to Holy shrines.” – School Library Journal

  • A first edition hardcover copy of Libyrinth by Pearl North.

“A unique world with two quick-witted heroines, an excellent book to get lost in.” – Maria V. Snyder, Bestselling author of Fire Study

  • A first edition hardcover copy of Reiffen’s Choice by S.C. Butler.

“Reiffen’s Choice will likely be a popular fantasy for years, or generations, to come.” – SCIFi.com

“Gill scores big in this action-packed, power-punch of a debut…All readers can do is buckle their seatbelts, close their eyes and take the plunge.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

  • A first edition hardcover copy of Radio Freefall by Matthew Jarpe.

“It’s the soul of rock and roll that saves the soul of humanity in this fun-house ride through the very near future. Jarpe has definitely got my attention!” – Karl Schroeder

  • A set of Wolfbreed and Wolf’s Cross by S. A. Swann.

“Vivid and visceral, dark and delicious, this one kept me turning pages from start to finish.” – George R. R. Martin

  • A hardcover copy of The Stones of Green Knowe by L. M. Boston.

“Stands on its own as an intriguing time-shift fantasy, deftly blending the real and the fantastic . . . written with grace and conviction.” – The Bulletin

“Young’s prose is simple and graceful, and her depictions, including several freakishly authentic New York neighborhoods, are subtly drawn.” – School Library Journal

  • A hardcover set of Gerald’s Game and Misery by Stephen King.

Pat’s note: Misery. The book Stephen King wrote in an attempt to keep other people from becoming authors.

“Set in the same universe as Weis’s “Star of the Guardians” series, this effort by the popular sf/fantasy author and first-timer Perrin is a fast-paced galactic adventure designed to introduce the motley crew of antiheroes known as the Mag Force 7. Spiced with humor and a dash of romance, this space opera should appeal to most fans of sf adventure.” – Library Journal

“The best science fiction writer to come out of Britain in the past fifteen years.” – Locus

“Croft’s ACRO series is fascinating to say the least and features an endless supply of agents just waiting to have their story told by this talented author! The multiple characters in Tempting the Fire keep the reader engaged as each facet of the action-packed, scorching plot is revealed!” – Reader to Reader Reviews

“There’s nothing ordinary about Ordinary Farm, a place filled with strange creatures and dangers around every corner. Readers will identify with Tyler and Lucinda and wish they were there with them. This is a rousing tale that should and will find a wide readership.” – Terry Brooks

  • A first edition hardcover of Here, There Be Dragons by James A. Owen.

“Is there anyone who wouldn’t enjoy reading Here, There Be Dragons?” If there is such a person, I haven’t met him, and I doubt that I would like him if I did. I am only disappointed that, because this book is so new, I’ll have to wait too long to read the sequels.” – Orson Scott Card

“Two words on the cover—Fiona McIntosh—always let me know that I’m in for a good read.” – Robin Hobb

  • A copy of the 2009 Nebula Awards Showcase edited by Ellen Datlow.

“An essential index of one year in SF and fantasy.” – Booklist

  • A hardcover copy of The Hunt for the Eye of Ogin by Patrick Doud.

“A thoroughly enjoyable adventure from first page to last.” – Midwest Book Review

  • A first edition hardcover copy of The Tale of the Swamp Rat by Carter Crocker.

“Crocker has created a realistic fantasy world, set in the swampland of Florida and populated with the animals that reside there. This timeless tale of an unexpected hero is narrated in a traditional folklore style by a mole who tells “every bit, just as it was. The rest I made up, as best I could.” With Southern flavor, adventure, and environmental drama, Ossie’s tale of finding his own way in the world will hit close to home for many.” – School Library Journal

“With a Kim Harrison novel, I expect action, humor, world building, strong female characters, true friendships, and a bit of realistic romance. I found it all right here.” – Melissa Marr, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked Lovely

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Remember, for every 10 dollars you donate on the Worldbuilders Team Page, you get a chance to win these books and hundreds of others.

What’s more, Worldbuilders will match 50% of your donations. So if you chip in before January 31st of 2012, you get a bigger bang for your buck.

To see the other books folks have donated, as well as our auctions, and the items we’re selling in the store, you can head over to our main page HERE.

Posted in Worldbuilders 2011 | By Pat16 Responses

Books, and an Interview with Nnedi Okorafor

This is a Worldbuilders blog.

Nnedi Okorafor was one of the very first writers I met when I was starting my publishing career. We both won places in Volume 18 of Writers of the Future back in 2002, and we met out at the workshop in LA.

I think I even have a picture of us back then at the award Ceremony. Let me see if I can find it….

(Awww…. Look at us. We’re cute as fluffy puppies…)

Nnedi’s a dynamo, and way tougher than I am. After I got my master’s degree, I left academia behind me, shaking the dust from my feet. But Nnedi got her PhD.

In fact, she got her PHD, had a baby, and launched her writing career pretty much all at the same time. Like I said: Dynamo.

But in addition to that, she’s a lot of fun. So when I started thinking of doing interviews for Worldbuilders, I thought of Nnedi….

Heya Nnedi. Let’s say you’re at a party and you meet someone you wanted to impress. What sort of things about your writing career would you casually drop into the conversation to prove that you’re awesome?

I’d mention that I won some awards and stuff and that I like to write about a Nigeria enslaved by juju-powered computers.

Which awards have you won? Anything super-cool?

My novel, Zahrah the Windseeker, won the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature. That was cool because not only did I win $20,000 but I was flown to Nigerian for a ceremony where I got to meet one of my greatest idols, Sub-Saharan Africa’s first Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka. Coolest day ever.

My children’s book, Long Juju Man, won the Macmillan Writer’s Prize for Africa. Last month, the University of Illinois gave me a Special Recognition Award. I’ve also been a finalist for the Tiptree Award, Golden Duck Award, Andre Norton Award, WSFA Small Press Award, Theodore Sturgeon Award, Essence Magazine Literary Award, an NAACP Image Award, blah blah.

Wow. That’s a lot of mojo. Back in the sixth grade I won an award for doing the best lip sync in my com class, but you’ve totally got that beat.

Uh, dude, you also won the freakin’ Quill Award and were a NYT bestseller. Can’t forget those, man. ;-)

They just gave me the Quill because I’m pretty. What are you reading right now?

Otherland by Tad Williams. I read the series back when it first came out. My disgust with District 9 made me want to reread it; to wash away the grime. It’s working. Next up, King’s Under the Dome.

If you had to pick your favorite book of all time, what would it be?

The Talisman by Stephan King and Peter Straub. I first read it when I was twelve. That book unlocked a door in me that will never close. I still return to it every so often, despite the character of Speedy Parker being a “Magical Negro”, heh.

That’s a term I first heard of because of you, but not a lot of people know about it. Care to explain?

There are five points I came up with to spot a Magical Negro. Speedy Parker hits them all (well, number 3 is a little shaky until Black House). Here they are:

1. He or she is a person of color, typically black, often Native American, in a story about predominantly white characters.

2. He or she seems to have nothing better to do than help the white protagonist, who is often a stranger to the Magical Negro at first.

3. He or she disappears, dies, or sacrifices something of great value after or while helping the white protagonist.

4. He or she is uneducated, mentally handicapped, at a low position in life, or all of the above.

5. He or she is wise, patient, and spiritually in touch. Closer to the earth, one might say. He or she often literally has magical powers.

Check out my essay, “Stephen King’s Super-Duper Magical Negroes”, on the Strange Horizons website here.

If you lost a bet and had to stand under Neil Gaiman’s window at midnight and serenade him. What song would you pick?

Lady Ga Ga’s “Poker Face”, the acoustic version.

Which would you rather do: cut out 20% of your current book, or insert a wacky talking animal sidekick (a la Disney movie) into half the chapters because the marketing people think it would make the book sell better.

Hey, I write for Disney (The Shadow Speaker is published by Disney and I’m writing a Disney Fairy chapter book titled Iridessa and the Fire-Bellied Dragon Frog). :-P. Plus I love wacky talking sidekick animals! I’ve got one in The Shadow Speaker. Well, Onion (Ejii’s camel) speaks in monotone and with very very few words but yeah. :-D.

Heh. I’ve read Shadow Speaker, but I never thought of the Ejii’s camel in the same vein as the classic Disney animal sidekick.

True. Onion’s nothing like Abu in Aladdin or Mu-Shu the Dragon in Mulan. But I think the wacky Disney side-kick can be an asset when done with some finesse.

I like the idea of a sh*t-talking parrot or miniature hedgehog who makes no sense whenever she speaks. Or how about a jive-talking black monkey whose catchphrase is “AW DAAAYAUM”?

What’s the best compliment you’ve ever received?

At a book signing, a grown man once told me that my YA novel Zahrah the Windseeker made him see spiders and insects everywhere he went for days. Ha ha, he looked relatively sane, but I guess you never know.

What’s the most hurtful thing someone has ever said in a review of your book?

This white guy (won’t mention names), once wrote that he wouldn’t read my novels because it’s full of black people and had no white characters to “balance it out”. Nice.

If you could punch one literary figure, who would it be?

HA HA HA HA! OMG, dare I answer this…nah. My response would be absolutely SCANDALOUS.

Aww… Come on. You tell me yours and I’ll tell you mine…

Believe me, you wouldn’t believe who it is. It would be very very bad press for me to speak the name. It’s utter blasphemy. But it makes me giggle that this name was the first thing to instantly pop into my head when I considered your question.

Okay. I don’t want to get you in trouble…

The poet Edith Sitwell used to lie in an open coffin each day before she started writing. Do you have any little rituals that help you write?

I have a lot of rituals. An interesting one is that I must turn on my space heater and set it right beside me. Even during most of the summer days. I need to be hot when I write. Ok, that sounds kind of suggestive. Heh, you know what I mean.

Through an effort of pure will, I’ll resist the urge to make the obvious joke….

I recently made a joke about “transition putty” on my blog. That being, of course, the what we writers buy at Home Depot to smooth out our rough transitions.

If you could have some sort of handyman tool like that, something like Plot Spackle or a Character Level. What would it be?

Natural-Looking Filler for those tough glaring gaps between the exciting parts of the story where crazy sh*t happens.

You can just say shit if you want. We’re all friends here. Nobody’s going to judge you.

Yeah, I figured it was ok with you. It’s just that I judge myself. I was raised to never use profanity, so it’s still odd for me. Ironically, I’m a big fan of cursing; it’s one of the reasons I enjoy hip-hop so much. I do most of my cursing in my fiction. Like in my short story, “On the Road” in the Eclipse 3 Anthology.

Hmmm… Now that you mention it. I cuss a lot in real life, but not very much in my books. I wonder if there’s a connection.

There is!

Maybe I need to save some of my cussing, so I can put it into a book later. I didn’t know it was a finite resource…. Anyway, that’s all I’ve got. Thanks so much for the interview, and thanks for donating some books to the cause.

:-). And thank you for putting it all together. I’m happy to be a part of it.


“Okorafor-Mbachu’s imagination is stunning.” – the New York Times


Remember folks, for every 10 dollars you donate to Heifer International, you get a chance to win hundreds of books like these: some signed, some limited edition, some out of print. Plus there’s the whole helping make the world a better place thing. That’s nice too.

And don’t forget, I’m matching 50% of all donations made. So why not head over to my page at Team Heifer and chip in. Trust me. You’ll feel great afterward.

Or, if you want to go back to the main page for Worldbuilders, you can click HERE.

With thanks to our sponsor, Subterranean Press.


(I keep trying to write a limerick, but nothing rhymes with Subterranean.)
Posted in recommendations, Subterranean Press, Worldbuilders 2009 | By Pat21 Responses

Subterranean Press Prizes

This blog lists generous donations made to the Worldbuilders fundraiser by:


If you want details about the fundraiser itself, you should read the blog HERE.

I’ve known the folks at Subterranean Press for a long while. Bill Schafer contacted me barely two weeks after The Name of the Wind hit the shelves and asked if I’d like to contribute a story to an anthology. It was one of the first clues I had that I might have done something right with my first book.

Subterranean Press publishes gorgeous books. Beautiful paper. Beautiful bindings. Stuff by great authors. Stuff that’s out of print. Stuff by Neil Gaiman, Tim Powers, Robert Heinlein, Ray Bradbury….

The last time I bought stuff off their website, I looked at my shopping cart and found myself thinking, “Next time I sell them a story, I should just negotiate my contract in store credit and save them the trouble of sending me a check.”

Last year Bill stunned me with his generosity, donating over $8,000 in books to the fundraiser. This year, he stunned me again, donating almost three times as many books. Beautiful hardcovers. Many of them limited editions. Many of them signed.

What’s more, he’s helping Worldbuilders match donations this year. That’s right, Subterranean Press will be providing funds to match 50% of the first 10,000 dollars donated this year.

This has earned him an eternal place in my heart, because it makes it much less likely that I’ll have to sell my house to match the donations this year.

Alright. Enough ebullience. Let’s look at some books.

(Are these cool covers or what?)

I’m a huge Tim Powers fan. Last Call was the book that really convinced me how brilliant he was, and the sequels are just as good.

I have it on good authority that owning these books will give you the strength of ten men, cure any illness afflicting you, and grant you eternal youth.

If you don’t believe me, then how about trusting the Los Angeles Daily News when they say Last Call is “Riveting…lyrical and brutal…a thrilling tale of gambling, fate and fantastic adventure.”




Subterranean Press describes The Terror as “a rigorously researched historical novel and a compelling homage to one of the seminal SF/Horror films of the 1950s. It is popular fiction of the highest order, the kind of intense, wholly absorbing epic only Dan Simmons could have written.”



Joe Hill’s a new writer who already has more than a few accolades to his name, including beating me out for Best Debut Novel in the Locus Awards last year.

I really enjoyed his book Heart Shaped Box, and while I haven’t read Locke and Key, Publisher’s Weekly says that it “…delivers on all counts, boasting a solid story bolstered by exceptional work from Chilean artist Rodriguez.”


Library Journal says the Onion Girl is “set in a modern world that borders on a dimension of myth and legend, de Lint highlights the life of one of his most popular characters. A master storyteller, he blends Celtic, Native American, and other cultures into a seamless mythology that resonates with magic and truth.”

This is a collection of five stories written by King and adapted to film: Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption (film version: The Shawshank Redemption), 1408, Children of the Corn, The Mangler and Low Men in Yellow Coats (film version: Hearts in Atlantis). Each story includes an introduction and commentary by King himself.

I’m sure many of you already know about John Scalzi through his blog Whatever. If not, I’d suggest you read this book to get to know him, but you might not have enough light to make out the text where you live, under what is undoubtedly a heavy, heavy rock.

Publisher’s Weekly says: “If J. G. Ballard and H. P. Lovecraft had ever collaborated on a space opera, the results might have been like this: ferociously inventive, painfully vivid, dispassionately bleak and dreadfully memorable.”


Bookslist reports that, “Dahlquist’s sequel to The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters (2007) is dark indeed… fans of Tobsha Learner’s Soul (2008) and Jonathan Barnes’ Somnambulist (2008) will enjoy this surreal Victorian journey into the nightmarish possibilities of mind swapping”


Where Everything Ends
is a collection of three of Ray Bradbury’s classical detective stories: Death is a Lonely Business, A Graveyard for Lunatics, and Let’s All Kill Constance.

On a personal note, I have to tell you that when I read Death is a Lonely Business ten years ago, it rocked my world. I grew up reading Bradbury, and I expect a lot from his work. Even so, it still knocked me over.

I didn’t even know about the third book in this series right now. Is it legal for me to donate money to my own fundraiser with the hopes that I’ll win something? Probably not. I’m kinda dodgy, and I’d probably rig things so I’d win.

Anyway, you don’t have to take my word that this is an awesome book. Green Man Review says that it’s “a trio of fine detective novels (together with the short story that provided the starting point) from Bradbury in his inimitable style. He plays with the conventions, but since he so obviously loves the genre, this is easily forgiven — embraced, even — because the end results are, simply put, fine additions to the canon.”

Remember, every 10 dollars you donate gives you a chance to win these and hundreds of other cool prizes, so head over to my page at Team Heifer and chip in.

Want more details about how it all works? Check out the Worldbuilder’s blog HERE.

Posted in Heifer International, recommendations, Subterranean Press, Worldbuilders 2009 | By Pat15 Responses
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