What should I do #11: Two Trilogies Better Than Mine.

Well, that’s a matter of opinion, I suppose. But one fact is indisputable, these two trilogies have something going for them that mine doesn’t. Both of them are already complete. That’s right, you can have all three books right now.

Both are by newish authors that you might not have run into yet. The first is Joe Abercrombie’s First Law series.

I feel a certain kinship with Joe, which partially stems from the fact that in April, both our books were nominated for the Compton Crook award. Then, in August, we were both denied our rightful positions as winners of the award. Or rather, I was denied my rightful position as winner, and Joe was denied taking runner-up by a narrow, narrow margin.

The books are good, really good. They pulled me in. Well-developed world. Unique, compelling characters. I like them so much that when I got to the end of the second book and found out the third book wasn’t going to be out in the US for another three months. I experienced a fit of rage, then a fit of depression, then I ate some lunch and had a bit of a lay down.

When I got up, I remembered that Joe and I share a publisher over in the UK. So, in my first ever attempt at using my newfound published-author powers, I e-mailed my editor over in England and begged them to send me the third book. I mean I *asked* them to. In a suave and sophisticated way.

I don’t believe in spoilers. So don’t I’m not going to give anything away. But I will say that the third book tied up the series quite nicely.

I will also say this. This isn’t some cookie-cutter fantasy. It’s refreshingly realistic, but also very gritty and dark. It might even be fair to call it grim. You have been warned.

The second trilogy I’m going to talk about is Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn. Some of you might recognize his name because I’ve mentioned him here before. Or you might know of him because Brandon is the author who’s been brought on board to finish Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series.

The Mistborn books are set in a fascinating world different from any fantasy I’ve run into before. He’s got a good grip on character and story, and his magic system is unlike anything I’ve ever run into before either. He makes it very solid and logical, while still leaving room for cleverness and mystery.

The third book of the trilogy: The Hero of Ages, comes out today. So you won’t be left hanging no matter how fast you read.

The truth is, Brandon’s books are so good that they’re starting to piss me off. I don’t mind that he’s a good writer. But he writes way, way faster than me. That makes me look like a chump.

Later all,

Pat

This entry was posted in recommendationsBy Pat55 Responses

55 Comments

  1. Sailor Matt
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 10:37 AM | Permalink

    Thanks for the recommendations, Pat. As I creep closer and closer to civilianization, I am finding more free time for a good book. Of course, I should probably be looking for a job, instead…Does Pat need a personal assistant? I can cook and clean, and I do laundry fairly well.

  2. Anonymous
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 10:56 AM | Permalink

    I really enjoyed The First Law, but thought the last few chapters of it were unnecessarily vicious.I know the books are meant to be dark, but those last few chapters were utterly miserable. They seemed to jar a bit with the rest of the books to me.About to try some Sanderson.

  3. Mieke
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 10:56 AM | Permalink

    I haven’t heard of the first series, but maybe I can write it on my never ending ‘to read/buy’ list …But I can say that I know the feeling when you’ve finished a damn good book you have to wait to read the next part. Just had it this week … The 2nd series you’ve described (Mistborn), I really wanted to order after I’ve read the first book of Brandon (Elantris).I just tought to wait until today (or later) to reduce the shipment costs (order them all at once).Considering your writing speed: take your time, don’t let anyone rush you. I’m prepared to wait until the 9th of april or even longer because I know it will be worth it!

  4. Ben
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 11:53 AM | Permalink

    ooh thanks. always good to try out new authors. Been meaning to read Sanderson since he got given the job of finishing up the WoT series (which I’m very excited about) Not sure whether I will enjoy the “grim” fantasy as I’m not sure whether you mean not very nice or just plain evil ;)

  5. shadowane
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 12:31 PM | Permalink

    I really enjoyed the first 2 First Law books. They seemed to be building to something and they were really interesting to read. However, I found the 3rd book to be a bit of a letdown. While the writing was still really good and as a story it was good, I felt the direction he went in was really at odds with where things were going in the first 2 books. It’s like something happened to him after writing the 2nd book and he was just angry. I’m really looking forward to reading The Hero of Ages too.

  6. Anonymous
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:08 PM | Permalink

    Nearing the conclusion of the 3rd book…very very good, not sure i’d say it’s better than yours but i’d put it at neck and neck along with Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Lock Lamora. Was actually going to email you yesterday and asked if you’d read abercrombie (not sure why) and then you posted this….weird.

  7. Amanda
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:15 PM | Permalink

    You don’t understand how many books I’ve been buying lately, and how badly I want these now…

  8. LisaBit
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:15 PM | Permalink

    Ah, I’m glad to hear something good about Mistborn – I just saw it in the book store this weekend and was curious.As for The First Law… well. I read the first book and then proceeded to write one of the more vicious book reviews I’ve ever put together. EVERYthing about the book rubbed me wrong, and I knit-picked it half to death. A couple of my friends were flabbergasted, as it seemed right up my ally. When the second book came out I was feeling a little guilty for having panned the first one so hard, especially with such resounding praise from my peers… so I gave the trilogy another chance, and was pleasantly surprised by how much improved the second book was. I just finished Last Argument of Kings, and I’m much happier with the trilogy now. Who knows what crack I was smoking for the first book…That said, I’d take NoTW over it any day ;P

  9. Mike
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:27 PM | Permalink

    I just finished The First Law last week and enjoyed it very much. There’s a lot of gray to the characters, and the fight scenes are bloody, properly scaled, and frequent. Mostly it’s fun, with a lot of intrigue.I simply levelled the first two books of Mistborn, however. They just drew me in – the magic’s fascinating, but the characters are both likable and believable, but more black/white than in The First Law. The world of Mistborn is much more industrial than agrarian. Plus, Sanderson’s really easy to read – he’s going to have to double his word count to approximate Robert Jordan’s style in Wheel of Time.

  10. Nick
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:46 PM | Permalink

    Thanks for the reminder to get myself out there and pick up a copy of Mistborn. I cant wait!

  11. Taur' Ohtar, Sereg Wethrin
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:48 PM | Permalink

    I recently ordered both Elantris and the first Mistborn book off Amazon because I found them at a bargain price and have been wanting to check out Sanderson for a while. It will probably take me a while to get to though. I’m thick in the midst of R.A. Salvatore’s Hunters Blades Trilogy, I need to read some more Wheel of Time Books, I have some Orson Scott Card to check out, and I must finnish the Illiad. (I recently got 26 books for five bucks at a local Library Book Sale…pretty awesome). I also need to re-read Name of the Wind before A Wise Mans Fear comes out, but I’ve got some time on that! lol. And I still have to read Tolkiens Unfinnished Tales. (and Tolkien, btw, is the King of Fantasy) no offense haha-Taur’ Ohtar, Sereg Wethrin

  12. Taur' Ohtar, Sereg Wethrin
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 1:49 PM | Permalink

    Also, are you yet working on another story??…(seeing as you had this one written in its entirity before the first was published)

  13. Erin Jump
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 2:29 PM | Permalink

    Thanks Pat! Going to Amazon to check them out now…

  14. Kip, Can read.
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 2:35 PM | Permalink

    I finished reading the First Law series a month ago, and I will warn people here:If you do not like books without a happy ending do not read. also it leaves the series nicely open for additional books later.The Plot in them is great and surprising.

  15. daemon82
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 2:41 PM | Permalink

    “But one fact is indisputable, these two trilogies have something going for them that mine doesn’t. Both of them are already complete. That’s right, you can have all three books right now.”This is actually a bigger issue for me than it should be. I will very very rarely pick up part of a series from the library without checking out the entirety of a series. It’s just too frustrating to come back and find out that I can’t just pick up the second book and tear through it. Part of it is that I do read really fast. I think the rest of me is just impatient and knows that when I finally get the next book, I’ll have to reread the others to remember exactly what was going onThis was more of a question than I like to admit when I picked up your book. I asked myself a few times if I really wanted to read a book where I wouldn’t get the sequels for a few years. And then I sucked it up and decided I’d heard so many good things I couldn’t possibly avoid it for the entire length of time it would take to finish writing all three. So I read it. And am (im)patiently awaiting the others. Does that mean you’ll have the best trilogy in existence once it’s done? Hmm… quite possibly….

  16. gypsyharper
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:17 PM | Permalink

    I’ll definitely have to check these out.I have to admit, I prefer to have series completely published before I read them. I didn’t realize yours was the first in a trilogy when I bought it (the book club flier never tells me that, for some reason), and I was somewhat irritated when I went to read it and discovered I couldn’t have the rest yet. But it’s so good that I forgive you.Amazon already has your next book available for preorder, but I will wait until it’s available from my bookclub, because they use a different size binding, and I’m neurotic about books from the same series being the same size on my shelf. :)

  17. Syrus
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:28 PM | Permalink

    I read the Abercrombie books as they were coming out and just picked up the final Sanderson and they can’t even be compared to each other, let alone to your book (get the next one out so i can make that books). What each series does is so different and both so good, but my preference is for Name of the Wind over them. If you throw in Scott Lynch and the Lies of Locke Lamora, I might agree his is better though.

  18. Anonymous
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:30 PM | Permalink

    Pat,I’ve read the first 2 First Law books and really enjoyed them. The characters were very gray, it was bloody violent, and it had a few characters that were so original I was surprised no one in fantasy every jumped on them before. It’s obvious Joe was inspired by GRRM’s Ice and Fire books and that is fine by me since those books (despite the ridiculously long wait between books) are amazing. As for Sanderson, I’ve read Elantris and thoroughly enjoyed it. It had a very original magic system, the story was intriguing, and the big reveal at the end was both flabbergasting and completely logical in explanation. I bought the first Mistborn in hardcover off a bargain from Amazon earlier this year but I haven’t read it yet. As for your book, I’ll be there on opening day to get a first edition printing. I really enjoyed Name of The Wind though I need my fix on what happens between Kvothe and Ambrose and the Chandrian need to show up again. Also, I hope Denna falls into a vat of boiling lava since she’s the most self-centered, abusive, manipulative character since Vanity Fair’s Becky Sharp. Please have mercy, oh great Lord Pat, only a few observations from a more discerning fan.

  19. Micah Cowan
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:46 PM | Permalink

    <>I experienced a fit of rage, then a fit of depression, then I ate some lunch and had a bit of a lay down.<>Oh good, so you <>do<> know how it feels. :p

  20. Anonymous
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 3:59 PM | Permalink

    I got the Last Argument of Kings yesterday in the mail from Amazon. Sweet!Long live the Bloody Nine!

  21. Leisa
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 4:01 PM | Permalink

    I was just thinking the very same thing as Micah Cowan above – welcome to our world!!!!

  22. Jonathan
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 4:11 PM | Permalink

    Thanks for the recommendations. It’s about time for the run to the bookstore to stock up, so I will add the First Law trilogy to the list.I have mixed feelings about Mistborn. I almost really, really liked it. The story, characters and magic system were original and creative, but the writing itself was frustrating. Sanderson has a habit of breaking the tempo at the exact wrong time, especially by overusing the word “however” – with the exception of dialogue, he needs to eliminate it from his vocabulary entirely. He also has a tendency to tell things he should be showing.I don’t want to sound like I’m flaming Sanderson here, it’s just the fact that I was so close to really enjoying Mistborn. I have read the first two books and I will read the third when it comes to paperback. Enjoyable: good, just not great.

  23. jrug
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 4:22 PM | Permalink

    Thanks for the tips.Your superlative craftsmanship is one of the things I enjoyed most about NotW. When WM’sF comes out, I won’t consider my time as a waiting fan to have been ill-spent; one hopes the Margrave of Brandenburg wasn’t nattering over Bach’s shoulder and complaining about late delivery.

  24. Joe Abercrombie
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 4:29 PM | Permalink

    Heh, heh, heh.Cheers for the shout, Pat. I owe you a drink or two when we finally meet…

  25. Whitney
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 5:31 PM | Permalink

    Don’t worry about being a “slow writer.” Actually, the April 7 (I think that’s the current release date?) release date is extremely handy for me…I’m a college student, and my spring break falls the last week of March, which allows me to re-read NOTW and be properly prepared for WM’sF. Of course, that also means that I will be utterly useless for about a week after WM’sF releases…

  26. Robert S
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 5:39 PM | Permalink

    The first law books are great. Having read all three I definitely agree with you on them. They are a different perspective than most books. While I wouldn’t recommend them to younger readers because of the violence and language they are great for adults.

  27. Alexis
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 6:19 PM | Permalink

    Chump.*laughs* Have you ever read any David Seddaris? That word always makes me think of one of the short stories from his work “Me Talk Pretty One Day”. The story, like much of his stuff, is hilarious. So funny in fact, that when I went to share it with some friends I totally botched the effort and instead they just heard gales of laughter and me struggling for breath instead of punchlines…

  28. Adam
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 6:20 PM | Permalink

    Just want to chime in again and second Micah’s notion. Now you know how we feel, Pat. I’ve read The Name of The Wind twice in the last year and April still seems too far off. Also, I want to add a comment to what Robert S said. Mr Abercrombie’s books aren’t exact for young readers. Kvothe has his adventures easy, sort of like a PG-13 movie. However in Joe’s world there are more f-bombs than an unrated Tarantino film and everyone seems to be killed, mauled, or tortured at least once a chapter.

  29. Judy
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 7:31 PM | Permalink

    Hi Pat – I too, have lived with the frustration of not having the next book in a series handy… but, unlike you, I don’t have a handy editor in the UK to help me out. :o) Therefore, amazon.uk and dymocks.com.au (for some reason I have a real love of Australian writers) have my info on instant rolodex. Can’t even add up all of the money I have spent on international shipping….. but when you come across a series that is THAT GOOD (Like Abercrombie’s, Steven Erikson’s Malazan books and yourself had you lived overseas!)it just becomes totally worth it!!!!

  30. Bufyluver
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 7:49 PM | Permalink

    That’s funny. I was blogging about this book a month or so ago. My dad gave me the first two (just as he gave me your book), but once I started, I had a hard time getting through it, actually. Yours, no problem. It was amazing and I never wanted to put it down once. The Blade Itself didn’t do that for me. I am still in the middle of it, trying to pick it back up again. I like Logan, but alot of the other characters distress me and it’s hard for me to connect to any of them. Maybe they develop later in the book and I just have to make it there…

  31. Kip, Look a monkey!
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 8:05 PM | Permalink

    SAN DAN GLOCKTA IS THE MAN!!!!!! Logen is cool too. Furious is great also.

  32. Anonymous
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 8:52 PM | Permalink

    Hey, at least you can write faster than George R.R. Martin.

  33. Harold
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 9:23 PM | Permalink

    Pat, can you please answer the question I keep asking you and which you are for some reason not answering? Can you confirm Daw’s projected release date for April 2009 for the next book?Harold

  34. Pamala Knight
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 11:01 PM | Permalink

    I’m jumping onto the Micah, Leisa bandwagon and getting a minute amount of solace out of your reaction to the other trilogies. I was laying out notecards so that for my current manuscript, the world building would be a little less haphazard, but then I noticed my copy of TNotW on the shelf and thought, why bother?Nevertheless, I offer my thanks for the recommendation.

  35. Shane
    Posted October 14, 2008 at 11:19 PM | Permalink

    Really enjoyed every bit of The First Law.I liked the first Mistborn book, but I didn’t like the second one very much. The relationship between Vin and Elend did not work for me at all. I’ll still be giving the 3rd one a shot, though. I really want to like Brandon Sanderson.

  36. Sedulo
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 5:59 AM | Permalink

    Great recommedations. I have read all of them and I cannot compare the two trilogies to one another, at least not in a small post.Abercrombie’s books are incredible and challenging because he writes characters that I ended up liking (some at arms length) in spite of the fact that they are not characters that one normally has much sympathy for in other fantasy I’ve read. It’s fitting for their world. If you are having a tough time, keep reading, it is worth it, you’ll end up liking someone in there. Also, I didn’t think the third book was out of sync, there were enough clues in the previous volumes that I wasn’t really blown away by surprise.Mistborn is a delight. Read it. It is mighty fine. So polished and shiny.

  37. marky
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 7:54 AM | Permalink

    So many books, so little time. I’ve got a reading list that should take me till TWMF is released.I’ve just finished the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series. They are totally addictive books. I highly recommend them.@Sailor Matt. Get a job ya bum!

  38. Anonymous
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 12:16 PM | Permalink

    Hey Sedulo (or anyone else with an interest),I think that’s why I found the end of The First Law disappointing. For 2 & a half books the characters were dark but likeable, but by the end of book 3 they’d pretty much been turned into irredeemable monsters. It seemed inconsistent with the rest of the books, as if the author was in a rush to be rid of them. I suppose it’s one way to avoid churning out book after book on the same world and characters.Did you honestly like many, even any, of the characters by the end of book 3?

  39. Sedulo
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 5:56 PM | Permalink

    @Anonymous:Actually I did like the characters in book three. They were fundamentally the same characters as in the first two. I didn’t like them in a “my new best friend” way, but for their situations in that world. Yes. They had to survive. Not an easy feat. It is a PTSD-fest.

  40. Anonymous
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 9:22 PM | Permalink

    Just Curious. What do you think of Christopher Paolini?

  41. Sedulo
    Posted October 15, 2008 at 11:09 PM | Permalink

    @anonymousPaolini wrote a nice note at the end of “Eldest” where he compared himself to his character Eragon. I thought it was very apt. Gadzooks, he is staggeringly popular. I believe he is improving as he keeps writing. Also, he is fortunate to have that much belief and support from his family. Lifetime kudos to them!Plus, dragons are cool. Especially if you get one of your very own.!I hope you read Mistborn. Based on your comments regarding “The First Law” It is likely that you’ll prefer Mistborn.

  42. Ben
    Posted October 16, 2008 at 12:24 AM | Permalink

    I read The Name Of The Wind and The Final Empire within a couple weeks of each other. They’re both fantastic books, just really very different from one another.I’m reading the Well of Ascension right now, by the way.

  43. *lynne*
    Posted October 16, 2008 at 3:10 AM | Permalink

    I’m waiting for Book #3 of Joe Abercrombie’s series to arrive at the local library – totally agree that it’s a gritty non-cookie-cutter tale :)It was with great shock I read your mention of Sanderson writing Robert Jordan’s final WoT book … I didn’t know Robert Jordan passed away. wow. I knew he’d been unwell, but wow.And yeah, I will certainly look out for Sanderson next time I’m at the library :)

  44. Spaxey
    Posted October 16, 2008 at 8:50 PM | Permalink

    Loved the series. Gritty and dark, but a refreshing change from the typical fantasy book.Also- Glockta is badass.

  45. Anonymous
    Posted October 16, 2008 at 10:17 PM | Permalink

    finished the Mistborn trilogy as well as the First Law books. Though is shouldn’t compare, im going to have to go ahead and do it anyway–Sanderson’s Mistborn is a far better read. Sanderson is the future of fantasy. I almost gave up on it–the The Final Empire was released…Him and Pat have alot in common–they both are obssessed with the worlds they’ve created. It’s nearing pathetic–it really is.

  46. Anonymous
    Posted October 17, 2008 at 3:07 PM | Permalink

    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/10/20/081020fa_fact_gladwell?currentPage=allLook, some authors just need more time to make their books perfect. Keep up the good work.Also, Hero of Ages, the third book in the Mistborn trilogy is amazing.

  47. Tina
    Posted October 18, 2008 at 3:01 PM | Permalink

    “I experienced a fit of rage, then a fit of depression, then I ate some lunch and had a bit of a lay down.” Now you know how I feel… I’ve had The Wise Man’s Fear pre-ordered since June 16th. However, I cannot wave my magic wand and make it appear like you!Last week, there was a teenager in a bookstore looking at books in the Fantasy section. I asked him if he was looking for something in particular. He replied that he wasn’t. So I told him about your book… and a few others afterward, but I guess I got him really excited about the Name of the Wind. I also told him about my everlasting torture waiting for the next book to come out. The fool bought your book. I warned him!Good thing I am not a crack dealer.

  48. Alex
    Posted October 21, 2008 at 9:01 AM | Permalink

    After reading your post, Pat, I immediatly ordered “The Final Empire”. I have now read the first 20 pages and it promises to be a good read.I know, perhaps way to early to leave such a comment, but at least his style of writing and the many mysteries looming on the horizon make me want to leave my desk NOW and get home to continue reading.So, thanks for the recomendation, now I will have somethin to read while waiting for YOUR next book (hrmpf, I just remembered, that about 60 Perry Rhodan booklets are waiting to be read also).

  49. perry
    Posted October 22, 2008 at 4:32 PM | Permalink

    I know I am late to this conversation, but I had been thinking about this recently. I quit reading fantasy for a few years because it was so stagnant. There was nothing good out there…and then I read Sanderson’s books, then Pat’s book, and then Joe Abercrombie’s books. All of this led me to think, ‘wow, these guys are really stepping up the fantasy game.’ It has really reinvigorated the genre. I cannot wait for Pat’s next book.

  50. Anonymous
    Posted October 23, 2008 at 1:35 AM | Permalink

    I have not yet read “The Blade Itself” or any others in that particular series, but i contemplate doing so every time i walk into my best frins room and see it sitting in a different place, and i just know it is because she has yet again picked it up and re-read a part just cause it is that awesome (something i do with your book, just so you know). I have read the first in the Mistborn series however, though i have not yet moved on to later ones since the first made me cry so hard. Yes i am a pansy, and no i am not afraid to admit it.This may be brown-nose-ish, but in my opinion it is entirely true.Your writing far overshadows Brandon Sanderson’s.There. I said it. it is true. Your type of writing is in its own category. Yours is not the faintly drab carrying on of J.R.R Tolkein (one of my favorite authors) or the not quite descriptive enough of Brandon Sanderson. You have humor, you have compelling desciptions that get out what needs to be said, and then move on, you have facinating characters that a reader feels as though they know because of the character development.

  51. Anonymous
    Posted October 25, 2008 at 8:26 PM | Permalink

    These are good triologies, and I thank you for mentioning the Mistborn one, since for some reason the Barnes and Noble site made no mention that the new book came out. Now, I must say, in my opinion your book is much better than these trilogies. I have come to the conclusion that no writer should continually divide the story between several characters. I prefer your book where Kvothe is the only main point of interest…it makes for a much better story in my opinion.

  52. Ciara
    Posted October 28, 2008 at 3:36 AM | Permalink

    *delurks* Just wanted to say I picked up The Final Empire after reading this post and am now three quarters of the way through the second book. I’m really enjoying them; thanks for the rec!

  53. tone almhjell
    Posted October 28, 2008 at 11:06 AM | Permalink

    So far, Patrick, I prefer yours.

  54. Anonymous
    Posted January 20, 2009 at 2:49 AM | Permalink

    Thanks for generously suggesting other new authors — something to tie me over until May…agh… Is it gauche to add a recommendation? I just finished Brent Weeks’ Night Angel trilogy (which got me wondering when are we going to hear more form that Kvothe guy??) The publisher offered the first “The Way of Shadows” (via Kindle) for a buck, which hooked me. After racing through it, they could have charged me twice the full price for the remaining two, it was that good. (Almost as good as you Pat!)(and with Kindle’s “instant gratification” policy, I can start on either Sanderson or Abercombie right away – yes, that was a plug for the ugly but convenient Kindle)Puh-lease, don’t be late for May.

  55. kat-nic
    Posted February 28, 2009 at 6:59 PM | Permalink

    Now Pat,(As you have no doubt noticed, I’m reading your blog archives because I’m still in the early stage of being in love with your book, the one where I glom anything even remotely related to it. However this is the first time I felt I really had to say someting even though <>you<> actually said it months ago. That and you disabled comments on your recent post.)I just read <>The First Law<> trilogy (okay, actually I’m still stuck on <>Last Argument of Kings<>) and I must dispute that it is way better than yours. I know, intellectually, that it is good, the world and the magic and the brilliant characterization. But you see, the reason your 1/3 of a trilogy wins hands down (IMO) is because you don’t seem to have the notion that your readers are ADD and can’t be expected to stick with just one character for hundreds of thousands of pages. I mean really, at one point, there were what, five different storylines in <>The Blade Itself<>? It drove me BONKERS. Just when I get good and involved with Logan we stop with him and go see how Jezal is getting on. And from him to Inquisitor Glokta, and Colonel West and <>occassionally<> Fero–It’s just a personal preference of mine, and no matter how great all other aspects of the book are, it will never win my heart.That being said, I do appreciate that you are writing a Big Damn Book. I’m not really upset at all about the pushed back release date. When you read as much as I do, waiting for the next book in a series is pretty much your default state of being. Waiting months or years for the new book, and then approximately one to three days of literary bliss, aaaaand it’s back to waiting for another couple of years. I see it as time well spent, because I too, want you to write the best book you possibly can. That, and I am also really into delayed gratification. No, seriously, I even eat all my sandwiches crust first.Also I may have to go ahead and check out the Mistborn trilogy. I keep seing it in the SFBC catalogue, but their blurb just isn’t very appealing. Yours makes it sound nicer and more worth my time and money. Thanks for the rec.Patiently,Kathryn

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